News

CASA Briefing Newsletter - May 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CASA Briefing

May 2017

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

I would like to sincerely thank everyone who took the time to respond to two important consultation documents released by CASA in recent months. A total of 160 submissions were made in response to the medical certification standards discussion paper, while 494 people responded to the discussion paper on frequency use at low levels in class G airspace. The comprehensive medical discussion paper set out a range of medical certification issues and options. Options ranged from continuing existing medical requirements to developing a new medical certificate for the sport and recreational sectors. The class G frequency paper put forward two options for radio broadcasts in the vicinity of aerodromes in class G airspace that are not marked on aeronautical charts. They were to use the appropriate area frequency or the MULTICOM frequency 126.7. Both these issues have attracted vigorous debate within groups in the aviation community for some time and CASA recognised the need to formally canvass the views of everyone who wanted to have their say. I believe the solid response to the papers has shown CASA took the right approach in undertaking formal consultation.

We have now published 70 responses to the medical certification paper on the CASA web site. These were responses where the person or organisation agreed to their submissions being published. Most of the leading aviation organisations submitted a response, including the Aerial Application Association of Australia, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Australian Airline Pilots Association, Recreational Aviation Australia and the Sports Aircraft Association of Australia. I also thank the many individuals who wrote their own submissions. CASA will now engage an independent party to develop a report on the medical certification submissions so we can clearly understand the views that have been presented on the various options. This will equip CASA to make decisions on potential changes to the medical certification system. A similar report will be created on the submissions to the class G frequency paper to facilitate timely decision making on the relevant issues. I can assure everyone that CASA is committed to finalising positions on both medical standards and the class G frequency as quickly as is possible, while not rushing into inappropriate decisions. Your comments and views are at the core of our decision making process.

Read the medical certification submissions.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Defect reporting is vital

The aviation community is being reminded of the importance of reporting aircraft defects to CASA. The new defect reporting service is easier to use and makes reported data more accessible to the aviation community. Aircraft operators, maintainers and manufacturers must submit a report for each malfunction, failure or defect that occurs under the relevant reportable categories. In addition, any defect which has endangered or may endanger the safe operation of an aircraft must be reported. The information on defects is carefully assessed by CASA to provide information that can be used to make sound regulatory decisions and to provide important advice to aircraft operators and maintainers. The defect reporting service allows users to share industry experience and assist in the early identification of potential issues. While some failures in aircraft parts are random, the probability of failure can often be estimated based on previous failure data. Historical failure analysis can be of value in determining inspection intervals and failure modes, particularly for components maintained on condition.

Find out more about defect reporting in an airworthiness bulletin.

New way to keep cables safe

CASA will soon be seeking comment on the details of a new approach to keeping primary flight control cable assemblies safe. The new approach will offer an inspection regime instead of the mandatory replacement of all affected flight control assemblies at 15 years’ time in service. This will provide relief from the cost and time needed to replace all affected flight control assemblies. An airworthiness directive issued in early 2015 - AD/GENERAL/87 Primary Flight Control Cable Assembly Retirement – put in place the mandatory replacement regime. The directive covered primary flight control cable assemblies with terminals constructed of SAE-AISI 303 Se or SAE-AISI 304 stainless steel with a total time in service of 15 years or more. The requirements of this airworthiness directive take effect from 1 January 2018. As the airworthiness directive currently stands this means flight control cable assemblies on affected aircraft that have already reached or exceeded 15 years’ time in service must be replaced before 1 January 2018. However, CASA will soon be issuing a proposed airworthiness directive which will put forward amendments to the current airworthiness directive, AD/GENERAL/87. The aviation community will be asked to comment on the proposed amendments before CASA finalises the new control cable assembly airworthiness requirements. CASA has now agreed that inspections - if performed in a particular and thorough manner - can satisfactorily address the risks of cracking and failure of control cable assemblies. The repeating inspection regime will require detailed inspection for evidence of corrosion and fraying, which if found, will require cable replacement.

New app to keep drones safe

A new smartphone app has been released to make flying drones safer. The app clearly shows crucial drone no-fly zones and drone fly with caution zones for drones operated in the under two kilogram commercial category. This information can also be used as guide for recreational drone flyers and certified remotely piloted aircraft operators. The app uses a drone flyers location to display no-fly zones around major airports, the flight paths of smaller airports and helicopter landing areas. Users will also see restricted and military airspace where drones must not be flown. The drone no-fly zones are shaded in red on the map. Orange shading is used to show fly with caution zones around areas where aircraft are known to operate at low altitudes. It is the first time an official app has been released in Australia to help drone flyers stay safe and abide by the safety regulations. Information is also shown for uncontrolled aerodromes and aircraft landing areas, with written advice about what to do when flying a drone in those locations. The app has been produced with specialist drone software company Drone Complier and will be available in Android, iOS and web-based HTML5.

Get the “Can I fly there?” drone app now.

Watch before you fly the outback

Winter is a great time to go flying in outback and remote areas of Australia. Before pilots take off for less populated areas they should take time to watch Out-n-Back Two. This is a spectacular aviation safety video mini-series for visual flight rules and recreational pilots. The ten part series covers a 3350 nautical mile trip from western NSW, through outback Queensland to Cape York, down the Queensland coast and back across country to Bathurst. The journey delivers a hands-on explanation of nearly 30 safety topics critical to all stages of flight. These include knowing your aircraft, weight and balance, fuel management, remote flying, fatigue management, radio calls, ageing aircraft, bird strikes, remotely piloted aircraft, emergency procedures and electronic flight bags. The safety information is delivered during interviews with local aviation people with expertise in each topic. The ten online videos feature stunning footage taken from cameras mounted on a Cessna 172 flown by chief flying instructor Catherine Fitzsimons.

Watch Out-n-Back series two now.

Jabiru wing bolts must be replaced

A requirement to replace wing attachment bolts on Jabiru aircraft has been issued. CASA has published an airworthiness directive calling for replacement of the quarter inch wing attachment bolts before or on reaching 2000 hours’ time-in-service. The replacement is to be done in accordance with a service bulletin issued by the manufacturer Jabiru. The service bulletin says all Jabiru aircraft feature strut braced wings with the root of each wing attached to the fuselage through two bolted joints loaded in shear. At manufacture these joints are secured using AN4 bolts. The service bulletin adds: “Examination of several airframes which have reached 5000 hours’ time-in-service revealed one only original AN4 bolt that was not in acceptable condition. The bolt was never replaced during the 5000 hour period. As a precautionary measure a 2000 hour life is now imposed on all AN4 wing attachment bolts, both the front and back.” CASA’s airworthiness directive says aircraft which have already reached 2000 hours’ time-in-service, must have bolts replaced before the next 100-hour or annual maintenance inspection, whichever occurs first. The airworthiness directive took effect on 22 May 2017.

More details in the CASA airworthiness directive.

Read the Jabiru service bulletin.

Remote pilot licence changes

Changes to the training requirements for remote pilot licences take effect from 1 June 2017. From this date all practical training to obtain a remote pilot licence must be done through an organisation holding a remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificate with a training approval. There are currently 36 organisations approved to provide practical remotely piloted aircraft training. The change means practical training can no longer be done through remote aircraft manufacturers or their agents unless they have a certificate and training approval. CASA has made the change to ensure all practical training is conducted by organisations that have an approved syllabus, qualified instructors, suitable facilities and appropriate record keeping. Practical training is carried out in the category of remotely piloted aircraft to be operated – fixed wing, helicopter or multirotor. Most people will complete their practical training on a remotely piloted aircraft with a maximum take-off weight of less than 7 kg and are limited to that weight class. People completing their practical remotely piloted aircraft training are required to have a minimum of five hours flight time logged on their aircraft type. Along with the practical training applicants must complete aviation theory training. This can be done in combination with the practical training provided by approved organisations, forming a complete remote pilot licence training package. It can also be completed by passing a CASA ground theory examination. CASA will continue to recognise practical training courses completed before 1 June 2017 conducted by drone manufacturers or their agents.

Get more information about remote pilot licences.

Seminars for pilots on now

CASA is holding eight safety seminars for pilots around the nation during June 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Horsham, Bunbury, Bankstown, Cessnock, Horn Island, Scone, Gold Coast and Archerfield. Seven of these seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. One of the seminars – Bunbury – will include a refresher on weather forecasts and a summary of accident/incident statistics over recent years. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate fuel management and partial power loss as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from past accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. All the seminars provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now.

Aviation ‘whatdunit’ takes mystery out of new regs

Air operators and pilots in Darwin have the chance to take part in a real life aviation whodunit in early June 2017. CASA is holding a crash scene investigation workshop to learn lessons from a Piper Chieftain accident and to apply those lessons to the need for key regulatory changes. The CSI workshop will be looking at how safety can be improved by more appropriate regulations for charter and small regular public transport operations. To understand the need for change participants will look in detail at the factors behind the Chieftain accident, which happened in poor weather conditions. A team of CASA specialists - with expertise in accident investigations, air traffic control and psychology - will be joined by an expert from the Bureau of Meteorology. The panel will work through the accident and then invite people taking part in the workshop to make linkages with more effective safety management through best practice regulations. Those attending will have a greater appreciation of the logic behind proposed changes to Parts 135 and 119 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, as well as how to be prepared for the changes. Part 135 will cover air transport operations in small aeroplanes and will set a common level of safety for what are currently classified as charter and regular public transport operations. The Darwin CSI workshop is free, will be held on Saturday 3 June 2017 from 10:00 to 15:30, with a light lunch provided.

Book your place at the Darwin CSI workshop now.

For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.

AMAS Inc UPDATE / RENEWAL INFORMATION 2017-2018

Members,

 

Please be advised:

 

UPDATE /  RENEWAL INFORMATION 2017-2018

 

The AMAS Inc Committee hope that the past year has treated you well and that you had many happy landings. AMAS Inc continues to grow with members in every state and territory and we hope that you’ll continue to renew with us.

 

As many of you may be aware, the CASA has now formally approved the society’s application, among other matters, to allow FPV flying. AMAS Inc works very closely with the regulator and you can expect a few more updates in the coming months ahead. The AMAS is considered an authority by CASA and trust our relationship with the CASA will only strengthen in to the future.


 Member fees.

On June 1st early membership renewal is open for the 2017/2018 financial year covering the period July 1st2017 until June 30th /2018 offering all the benefits that AMAS membership provides members and clubs.

The fees are as follows (and are again reduced!):

 

12    Month Membership $45 Senior and $22 Juniors

 

The Future.

 

Our hobby is about family, friends and having fun.  We thought about reducing our fees again this year(via Treasurer/Budget projections) and of which you can see above we have(within 10% of current fees as per the Constitution)! However an idea was put forward further to this subject to reduce fees, for example adjust the senior fee and the money offset could be used to fund juniors. (As you can see we've reduced the fees anyway).This small amount is an investment in the future of the hobby whilst reaffirming our commitment to promoting the family and friends aspect of the hobby.

 

The AMAS Committee will be submitting a Motion to be put to the members at the Annual General meeting, for a vote by the entire  membership , as per the Constitution.

(http://www.amas.org.au/hosted/org/67/docs/68a5a0f0/AMASCONSTITUTIONAMENDED03October2015.pdf)

 

Motion: “To promote and encourage Juniors to participate in our sport/hobby, we will offer a zero membership fee in order that they may be able to join our great organisation at no cost whatsoever to themselves or parents.”

 

The entire membership is encouraged to consider the matter and provide feedback/variation to the matter.

 

Now is a great time to join up potential members!

.

The AMAS Committee hope it will encourage the younger generation to embrace the joys of aeromodelling in the coming years.

 

We trust this motion will be supported by our ever increasing membership!

 

 Earlier this year it was decided that due to the ever increasing workload of our Secretary, who has diligently provided a virtual 24 hour seven day service to our ever increasing membership, that in

recognition of the of the outstanding service he has provided on a voluntary basis for five years is long overdue, and on that basis he will receive a very modest Honorarium of $1000 at the end of this financial year. All other Committee members are volunteers and receive no remuneration. Minor expenses are reimbursed. This is many, many thousands of dollars less than people in other organisations receive for an equivalent number of members, and of course is only a pittance in terms of the hours spent on the affairs of this Society.

 

In accordance with his previous comments made over the last 18 months ,we wish to advise that our current Vice President and Life member Mr John Taylor will not be standing for any positions on the AMAS Committee at the Annual General Meeting later in the year, as he is retiring and  intending to spend more of his time just building and flying.

Having by then reached the grand age of 81 it is his time to move on and watch younger people come up with fresh ideas to grow our Society and Sport/hobby. We wish him well in total retirement!

 

Many of you expressed an interest in joining the committee, as noted in the recent member survey and we look forward to hearing from you. Simply phone of email the secretary for more information. You do not need any experience and we need people from all walks of life from across Australia. So what are you waiting for …..  Get involved today.

 

Finally we would remind all members and clubs to check out our website(as it is a 'Live' document) for any changes  that have occurred in the last year, and to get in early to renew your membership from June 1stwhen a reminder Bulletin will be sent out with all the details for the coming year.

 

*An update regarding the Loganholme Aeromodellers Radio Control Society (LARCS) which was devastated in the recent TC Debbie aftermath: The President Mr Michael Davis advised that operations will shortly recommence after much Logan Council, external and club member action cleaning up. The LARCS President also sends thanks on behalf of the LARCS membership for the overwhelming assistance given after the event and thanks the AMAS Inc membership for the kind donation for five thousand dollars towards disaster relief.

 

On behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

 

 

 

Changes to approved training for commercial drone operation.

Changes to approved training for drone operation

Tuesday 17 May 2017

The practical training requirements for gaining an Australian Remote Pilot Licence (RePL) will change from 1 June 2017.

The changes were set when amendments to Civil Aviation Safety Regulations Part 101commenced on 29 September 2016.

A RePL is required if you are operating a drone outside of the standard operating conditions applicable to the excluded category.

The excluded RPA category allows low-risk RPA operations in certain circumstances without the need for a ReOC or RePL. This includes commercial operators with RPAs lighter than 2 kilograms and some private landowners and leaseholders operating RPAs up to 25 kilograms. Private landowners and leaseholders operating above 25 kilograms are required to hold a RePL.

From 1 June, RePL applicants will satisfy the training requirements by completing a RePL training course conducted by a person holding a RPA Operator’s Certificate (ReOC) that authorised the training. Applicants can also apply to CASA for a flight test.

CASA will continue to recognise practical training courses completed before 1 June 2017by drone manufacturers or their agents. CASA approved training organisations are located across Australia in regional and metropolitan areas and a list of approved drone operators. including those who can conduct training, can be found on the CASA website. Traditional aviation flying schools can also provide aeronautical knowledge theory training.

Drone manufacturers and their agents who wish to provide practical training for the issue of a RePL from 1 June 2017 must hold a ReOC that authorises the training.

Depending on the training approval each ReOC holder has obtained, they can train in a range of categories (i.e. aeroplane, rotorcraft etc.) related to specific remotely piloted aircraft or drones.

An information package on becoming a certified training provider is available from CASA by emailing RPAS@casa.gov.au. To receive a package by reply email, include “manufacturer training approval” in the subject line.

More information about the advantages of holding a RePL can be found on the Flying drones/remotely piloted aircraft in Australia pages on the CASA website. All inquiries can be emailed to CASA at RPAS@casa.gov.au

SENATE DRONE INQUIRY MEDIA RELEASE 10TH MAY 2017

CASA Briefing Newsletter - April 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CASA Briefing

April 2017

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

The Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester, has issued a new Statement of Expectations to the CASA Board. This is an important document that sets out the strategic directions the Government expects CASA to head in between now and mid-2019. It also sets out how CASA is meant to perform its functions. As a notice provided under the Civil Aviation Act, the Minister’s Statement of Expectations guides the CASA Board’s strategic deliberations and decision making. CASA’s next Corporate Plan will reflect the strategic directions in the Statement. The Minister has made it clear that CASA’s regulatory activity should be pragmatic, practical and proportional. Mr Chester has said a pragmatic, practical and proportional approach to regulatory activity is intended to help support aviation growth, particularly in the general aviation sector. It is important to understand the Statement of Expectations builds on the work CASA has been undertaking in recent years to lift our performance in a range of key areas. These include CASA’s approach to safety regulation, the development of new regulations and stakeholder engagement. The Statement of Expectations also reinforces CASA’s commitment to our Regulatory Philosophy. Of course it should not be forgotten that the Statement of Expectations makes it clear CASA will continue to ensure the highest priority is given to aviation safety.

The Minister also recently announced the appointment of Ms Cheryl Cartwright to the CASA Board. I welcome Cheryl’s appointment as she will add more diversity of experience to the Board and lift the gender balance close to 50 per cent, which is great for our organisation. Cheryl has a background in government relations, strategic planning and communications. This appointment is consistent with CASA’s governing legislation, which stresses the importance of an appropriate balance of professional expertise on the Board to complement the aviation experience of current Board members.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Cold and flu drugs could put you at risk

Winter is coming and it’s time for everyone in safety sensitive positions in aviation to think carefully about cold and flu medications. Codeine, which is found in a number of cold and flu treatments, is a drug included in the aviation drug and alcohol testing program. If codeine is detected during testing a person is required to stop work until they are cleared by either a CASA doctor or under the provisions of their company’s Drug and Alcohol Management Plan. Naturally this means disruption to normal work and rosters and for casual workers possibly lost income. To avoid testing positive for codeine people working in aviation sensitive roles, such as pilots, maintainers and cabin and ground crew, should seek advice from their doctor or their company’s drug and alcohol management personnel before taking cold and flu treatments. Over the counter medications can cause side effects which impair the ability to perform to required standards and so put safety at risk. The permitted level of codeine under the drug and alcohol regulations is 25 nanograms per millilitre. In 2015-16 CASA conducted 16,598 random drug and alcohol tests on safety sensitive aviation personnel.

Find out more about drug and alcohol testing.

How to protect low use engines

New advice has been released on how to protect piston aircraft engines that are not flown regularly. These engines are susceptible to damage from corrosion and contamination, which may adversely affect expected service life. In coastal areas and areas of high relative humidity corrosion attack can occur within a few days. Aircraft operators with aircraft that are flown infrequently should follow the instructions of engine manufacturers as well as be aware of a range of key issues. These issues are set out in an airworthiness bulletin which covers the use of preservation oil, establishing an appropriate engine preservation threshold and regime, calendar time oil changes and engine ground running. The need for engine preservation should be evaluated by aircraft operators, taking into account environmental conditions and periods of aircraft inactivity. Changing oil on a calendar time basis for low utilisation engines is an effective means of removing contaminants such as water and the by-products of combustion. Engine ground running is not a substitute for regular flying and will in fact tend to aggravate rather than minimise corrosion. Similarly, the practice of pulling engines through by hand when aircraft are not run or flown for extended periods can also exacerbate problems.

Get all the details on protecting engines.

Cost recovery changes reduce costs

CASA’s cost recovery arrangements are being streamlined and improved. Changes are being made to cost recovery for international and domestic travel, legislative instruments and refunds on fixed fees. The changes will reduce a range of regulatory costs to the aviation community. In line with Australian Government policy CASA is required to recover costs for providing regulatory services. Fees apply to regulatory services such as licences and ratings, examinations, medicals, aircraft registration, certificates, permits, exemptions, approvals and authorities. Fees are charged at hourly rates or as fixed fees starting from $25. The time charged for international travel by CASA to provide regulatory services is being changed to a standard working day rather than an hourly rate. CASA’s satellite offices in Broome, Kununurra, Gove and Horn Island will be treated as fully operating offices for the purposes of cost recovery. This will reduce travel charges for some regulatory services in these areas, benefitting local aviation communities. CASA will also standardise the way in which charges are applied for the drafting and lodging of Federal Registered Legislative Instruments. This will provide greater certainty and consistency and ensure that CASA does not charge more than is required for this work. There will now be partial refunds of fixed fees where a task is not required to be completed and a fee has been paid in advance. Changes to cost recovery will take effect from 1 May 2017.

Find out more about CASA’s cost recovery.

Approved testing officer delegations extended

Existing approved testing officer delegations are being extended for another 12 months - until 30 June 2018. These delegations, which allow approved testing officers to carry out certain flight tests and proficiency checks, were to have expired on 30 June 2017. The extension has been made while the indemnity arrangements that currently cover approved testing officers are comprehensively reviewed. Under changes introduced in the new licensing suite of regulations approved testing officer delegations are being replaced by a flight examiner rating. This change meant current indemnity arrangements, which only cover delegates and authorised persons, ceased once approved testing officers moved across to the flight examiner rating. The 12 month extension of the existing delegations means the indemnity protection offered to all CASA delegates and authorised persons, as set out in Civil Aviation Advisory Publication (CAAP) Admin-1, will apply to people who continue to hold an approved testing officer delegation. Approved testing officers who still have their delegation and have not obtained a flight examiner rating do not need to take any action at this time. A working group comprising CASA, the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development and the Department of Finance has been established to examine all aspects of the indemnity scheme and insurance-related considerations. A policy paper on the issues will be produced for comment during 2017. This will look at whether indemnity arrangements should continue and if indemnity does continue the nature and extent of the coverage.

Find out more about the approved testing officer delegations.

New look for aviation medicine online

The web site that provides information about aviation medicine is changing. The current aviation medicine web site is being integrated into the main CASA web site. This will change the design and layout of the aviation medicine web pages, while all essential information and functionality is retained. The change could affect some bookmarks of individual aviation medicine web pages. As part of the move to the CASA web site all aviation medicine online information has been reviewed to make sure it is up-to-date and easy to find. The search functions for Designated Aviation Medical Examiners and Designated Aviation Ophthalmologists will continue to operate in the same way. The changes will not affect the medical records system or the login procedures. CASA has undertaken user testing of the new aviation medicine web pages to make sure they meet the needs of the aviation community. The new web pages are scheduled to go live in May 2017.

Visit the aviation medicine web pages.

Cabin crew ratio clarified

The federal government has supported the continuation of approvals for a ratio of one cabin crew member to every fifty passenger seats on some domestic aircraft. This follows a parliamentary committee inquiry into cabin crew ratios. In a statement the government said there was unequivocal advice from both CASA and Office of Transport Security that having a one to fifty cabin crew ratio in Australia did not reduce the safety or security of domestic aircraft operations. Most major international safety regulatory authorities around the world endorse the one to fifty ratio. CASA issues individual directions to airlines permitting a one to fifty cabin crew ratio if aircraft have been certificated by the state of design for this ratio. Airlines need to have in place an approved robust safety management system and safety risk management plan to have access to the ratio on specified aircraft. The statement by the government said the Office of Transport Security has confirmed that since the use of the one to fifty cabin crew ratio was permitted on some Australian aircraft in 2006, there has not been a diminution of security standards in Australia.

Read the statement on cabin crew ratios.

Ten seminars for pilots coming soon

CASA is holding ten safety seminars for pilots around the nation during April 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Inverell, Innisfail, Jandakot, Armidale, Merimbula, Townsville, Jabiru, Esperance, Alice Springs and Ayers Rock. Eight of these seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. Two of the seminars – Jandakot and Esperance – will include a refresher on weather forecasts and a summary of accident/incident statistics over recent years. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate fuel management and partial power loss as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from past accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. All the seminars provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now.

Seminars for engineers

Two engineering safety seminars are being held in May 2017. An engineering seminar will be held at Caloundra on Wednesday 17 May 2017 and at Alice Springs on Tuesday 23 May 2017. These seminars are aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations. CASA aims to support the professional development of people in these safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources. Importantly the seminars will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA. Topics to be covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and the Part 64 review. Part 64 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations covers the requirements needed for an authorisation to operate an aeronautical radio or the authority to taxi an aeroplane.

Book your place at an engineering seminar.

Hobart airspace study

A study of the airspace around Hobart aerodrome has made three recommendations. The study, conducted by CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation, says the existing airspace classification and architecture should remain unchanged, except for one adjustment to a controlled area step. It is recommended that Airservices Australia continues redesign work for flight routes into and out of Hobart, making improvements to existing terminal instrument flight procedures and introducing standard arrival routes. The report says CASA should monitor aircraft and passenger movements and incidents at Hobart over the next 24 months to determine whether a trend of traffic growth continues. An aeronautical risk review should then be conducted if necessary. There has been a steady growth in traffic movements at Hobart over the last four years. The annual number of airspace related incidents at Hobart has remained low, with seven incidents recorded between December 2009 and June 2016. There were no injuries from any of the incidents. Airspace users reported that on occasions they experienced delays in receiving airways clearances and there were general inefficiencies in the use of airspace. Stakeholder comments highlighted that occasionally the tower frequency experienced congestion and over transmission occurrences.

Go to the full Hobart airspace study report.

For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.







COMMERCIAL RPAS INCIDENT-APRIL2017

AMAS Inc Member Survey Results

QLD STATE GOVERNMENT FUNDING FOR DISASTER AFFECTED SPORTS CLUBS

Members,

For your information below:


 Member Memo 6/17 – 6 April 2017

 

STATE GOVERNMENT FUNDING FOR DISASTER AFFECTED SPORTS CLUBS

 

Below is a copy of emailed advice received from the Minister for Sport regarding funding being put in place to assist clubs recover from Tropical Cyclone Debbie and its aftermath.

 

Any queries should be directed to Sport and recreation Services on 1300 656 191.

 

Regards

PETER CUMMISKEY

Chief Executive Officer

  

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Sports House
Cnr Castlemaine & Caxton Streets
MILTON  QLD  4064

 

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Telephone      07 3369 8955

Facsimile       07 3369 8977 
Email             admin@qsport.org.au

Website:        http://www.qsport.org.au/

 

This e-mail and any files transmitted with it are confidential and is for the use of the individual or organisation to whom it is addressed to above. If you are not the intended recipient you have received this e-mail in error. Any use, dissemination, forwarding, printing, copying or dealing with this e-mail is strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please reply immediately by way of advice to admin@qsport.org.au or telephone 07 3369 8955.

 

 

 

 

Please see below or this link for the Minister for Sport’s media release on disaster affected sports clubs.

 

For further information or assistance, phone 1300 656 191.

 

Media Statements

Minister for Housing and Public Works and Minister for Sport
The Honourable Mick de Brenni

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

$12 million prioritised for disaster affected sports clubs

Sport and recreation clubs in areas affected by Tropical Cyclone Debbie and its aftermath will have access to immediate assistance and priority assessment for upcoming sports infrastructure funds. 

Inspecting damage at the MAD Mountain Bike Club in Mackay, Sports Minister Mick de Brenni announced the availability of $1 million is a special disaster recovery program to assist with immediate needs. 

Under the disaster recovery program clubs can apply for grants of up to $5,000 to assist with urgent needs such as replacing equipment or making repairs to clubhouses or grounds. 

“This will assist sports clubs with repairing or reconnecting damaged electrical equipment, repairing plumbing, and cleaning facilities to bring them up to scratch for immediate use,” Mr de Brenni said. 

“In addition, today I have directed Queensland’s Sport and Recreation Services to amend the guidelines and expedite the assessment process for Queensland’s upcoming sports infrastructure funding round. 

“I will be remaking the official guidelines for this $11 million program so as to prioritise funding towards clubs and organisations in areas affected by Cyclone Debbie and its aftermath. 

“The updated guidelines will shortly be published on the department’s website.

“Under our sports infrastructure grants program grants of up to $100,000 are available for clubs to upgrade, replace or build new infrastructure.

"We’ve seen the damage that has been done by Cyclone Debbie and the floods across so much of the state, and a lot of sports clubs have felt the full force of its fury. 

“Sports clubs across Queensland are run by volunteers, and volunteers in disaster areas already have enough on their hands with their own homes and businesses. 

“Local clubs are dear to the heart of our communities, especially in regional areas, and we want to make sure that we give as much support as possible to help the community move on from these events. 

“I encourage every club in the disaster affected areas, no matter how big or small, to get in touch with Sport and Recreation Services.”

Member for Mackay Julieanne Gilbert said local clubs across Mackay and the Whitsundays have seen significant damage.

“The MAD Mountain Bike Club here in Mackay has been gearing up to host the State Championships in October this year,” Ms Gilbert said.

“This funding will help clubs like this get back up and running so that we can continue to run top level events here in North Queensland.”

Application forms are available from local Sport and Recreation Services Offices or online at www.nprsr.qld.gov.au. For further information or assistance, phone 1300 656 191.

[ENDS]

Kind regards

 

Khiraan Kumar

Senior Policy Advisor

Office of the Hon. Mick de Brenni MP

Minister for Housing and Public Works

Minister for Sport

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

P 07 3719 7270 | Email: Khiraan.Kumar@ministerial.qld.gov.au

GPO Box 2457 Brisbane QLD 4001

 

 

Loganholme Radio Control Aeromodellers Inc flood disaster. "Call to Action".

Please be advised:

The Loganholme Radio Control Aeromodellers Society Inc has experienced a severe weather event stemming from ex cyclone Debbie and has suffered immense flood damage to its infrastructure and equipment. The club website can be found here:

http://www.larcs.com.au/

and Facebook page, which shows example of the devastation, can be found here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/341678649335809/ 

Help is on the way!

The AMAS Inc has been advised that the LARCS club is underwater as a result of the flooding caused by cyclone Debbie. The full extent of the damage is unknown however the club facilities and equipment are currently under water.  The AMAS Inc  intends to make $5000 immediately available to assist LARCS with the recovery.

Moving forward the LARCS will most probably require, for example, earth moving equipment, technical expertise, trade assistance etc, so if you’re able to assist please let the AMAS Inc or better still LARCS committee know:

Ian Flanders, LARCS Secretary, larcssec@gmail.com  

and LARCS contact details here:

http://www.larcs.com.au/crew

How can you help? You may be in another state and wonder how you can help out because in the unfortunate event that something was to happen to your field you would expect the AMAS and members of your society to help you. Perhaps you or your club could make a donation to LARCS or you could hold a BBQ, a raffle. Aeromodelers are an amazing group of very talented and generous people. Every little bit counts so please discuss with your club committees.

Please help spread the word because I’m sure that members of clubs affiliated with other Societies would be willing to lend a hand because after all,  we’re aeromodellers.

 

As more is known the AMAS committee will keep you all informed. 

Radio Control Model News

Correspondence has been received from Mr Stephen Green, editor for Radio Control Model News, indicating he has available some article space within the magazine and is offering this space to interested AMAS members who can provide items for inclusion such as flying field news or current and up and coming event news.

Stephen can be contacted at: stephen@rcmnews.com regarding the above mentioned offer.


CASA Briefing Newsletter - March 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


CASA Briefing

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Shane Carmody

An important milestone in Australian aviation was reached this month.  Australia and the United States signed off on amendments to our bilateral aviation safety agreement which make Australian access to the lucrative American aviation market cheaper and easier.  The changes will benefit Australian aviation parts and products designers and manufacturers, as well as people and companies that export aircraft and aircraft products to the United States.  In a range of circumstances these amendments allow for easier acceptance by the US Federal Aviation Administration of CASA supplemental type certificates and associated Australian authorised release certificates. The changes will deliver a significant financial boost for a number of sectors of the Australian aviation industry, including small design organisations, parts suppliers and large airlines.  New opportunities will be created to sell existing designs and products and to grow business.  Importantly, costs are reduced without compromising safety.

CASA will continue to work with other like-minded safety regulators around the world to develop and improve arrangements that can benefit Australian aviation.  We are committed to expanding opportunities for the Australian aviation industry by keeping regulatory burdens as light as possible while maintaining our enviable safety record.  Developing and improving these kinds of arrangements is a process of negotiation and co-operation between regulatory partners that takes time and patience, but the results can yield big rewards.  I would like to thank everyone who worked on the changes to the bilateral agreement with the United States, including a number of people from the aviation industry.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety

Spectacular new safety video for VFR pilots

A spectacular new aviation safety video mini-series for visual flight rules and recreational pilots has been released.  The ten part series covers a 3350 nautical mile trip from western NSW, through outback Queensland to Cape York, down the Queensland coast and back across country to Bathurst.  The journey provides a hands-on explanation of nearly 30 safety topics critical to all stages of flight.  These include knowing your aircraft, weight and balance, fuel management, remote flying, fatigue management, radio calls, ageing aircraft, bird strikes, remotely piloted aircraft, emergency procedures and electronic flight bags.  The safety information is delivered during interviews with local aviation people with expertise in each topic.  Those interviewed include people with experience in outback flying, remote aerodrome refuellers, a Royal Flying Doctor Service representative, an air traffic controller, local pilots, a helicopter mustering pilot and a licensed aircraft maintenance engineer.  There are also several interviews with CASA personnel covering CASA activities in regional areas.  The ten online videos feature stunning footage taken from cameras mounted on a Cessna 172 flown by chief flying instructor Catherine Fitzsimons.  Out-n-Back series two are must see videos for all pilots who appreciate the spectacle and enjoyment of flight across Australia.

Watch Out-n-Back series two now.

Work to find risks to pilot health

An important initiative aimed at improving the understanding of the health of pilots has been launched.  The Queensland Institute of Medical Research approached CASA about a collaborative project with air operators to identify medical risk areas in the pilot population.  CASA’s principal medical officer, Dr Michael Drane, says data will be drawn from within CASA’s medical records system, which contains a “treasure trove” of longitudinal medical data dating back to the 1990’s.  Dr Drane says: “This data, which does not identify individuals, can be used to pinpoint medical problems and how they have developed in the pilot population by applying a scientific method to this unique occupational group.  We can then be ahead of the game in identifying risk areas, looking to reduce risks and in prevention.  A number of projects are being considered, with one of the first areas to be studied being the skin cancer melanoma and the increased incidence in pilots.  The aviation environment may be contributing to melanoma risks and we are looking to understand the nature of this illness in aviation.”  The project is consistent with updated International Civil Aviation Organization Standards and Recommended Practices which provide a role for safety regulators in aviation health promotion and preventative health care.  Other health areas that may be examined in the future include obesity, sleep apnoea and pterygia – growths on the eye which have been linked to exposure to ultraviolet light.

Comment now on class G frequencies

All pilots are being urged to have their say on the most appropriate radio frequency to use at low levels in uncontrolled airspace.  A discussion paper has been issued setting out two options for radio broadcasts in the vicinity of aerodromes in class G airspace that are not marked on aeronautical charts.  The options are to use the appropriate area frequency or the MULTICOM frequency 126.7.  This issue impacts all pilots that fly in uncontrolled airspace and CASA is calling for a wide response to the discussion paper.  The discussion paper sets out detailed arguments and safety assessments for both options, as well as looking at overseas practice.  CASA’s acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said there were various views on the issue and it is time to determine the best outcome in the interests of aviation safety.  Mr Carmody said: “To do that we need all pilots to send us their comments now.  We want to hear from recreational pilots, private pilots, commercial pilots, aerial work operators and airline flight crew.  CASA will not make a final decision on the class G frequency issue until we carefully review all feedback and publish a summary of the results of the consultation.”

Go to the class G radio frequency discussion paper and comment before 28 April 2017.

Drones on the up and up

The number of drones in the Australian sky is growing rapidly.  Tens of thousands of people now fly drones for fun and thousands more are in commercial and aerial work operations.  There are now more than 950 holders of remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificates and nearly 4000 people have notified CASA of their intention to operate in the new under two kilogram commercial category.  There are more than 4600 people who hold a remote pilot licence, which authorises them to fly for certified remotely piloted aircraft operators.  In 2013 there were 60 certified remotely piloted aircraft operators and 166 remote pilot licence holders.  With all this growth in drone operations there inevitably comes a level of complaints or reports of potentially unsafe operations.  To streamline the reporting of complaints and incidents CASA has set up an online form to capture the essential information required for a potential investigation.  The form asks for available evidence such as images or videos, the date, time and location of the incident, identification details of the drone and the identity of the drone pilot.  It is made clear that for an investigation to take place CASA must have sufficient evidence of a potential breach of the drone safety regulations, as well as evidence of the person controlling the drone at the time.

Always report unsafe drone operations using the complaint form.

Government GA advisory group meets

The federal government’s new General Aviation Advisory Group met for the first time in March 2017.  There was discussion about a range of key issues including the classification of operations, levels of flying activity, skills and training, and regulatory reform.  The Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester attended the meeting in Canberra and said direct engagement between the industry and the government was key to achieving the common goal of a safe, growing and sustainable aviation industry.  "The General Aviation Advisory Group will ensure the industry has a voice at the heart of Government by providing advice directly to me on matters affecting the general aviation sector,” Mr Chester said.  He reiterated that the aviation sector should develop strategies to attract young people, including more women, into the industry.  The Group received a briefing from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics on the progress of the General Aviation Study and members provided initial comments to inform the study going forward.  The Group also agreed on its terms of reference and operating protocols.  “I look forward to working with the General Aviation Advisory Group to address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities that lie ahead for the sector in Australia,” Mr Chester said

Find out more about the General Aviation Study.

Safety seminars for pilots on now

CASA is holding seven safety seminars for pilots around the nation during April 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Derby, Broome, Dubbo, Mudgee, Bathurst, Geraldton and Maitland – York Peninsula.  These seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft.  Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as the cause of a high number of accidents.  Lessons will be learnt from accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided.  Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast.  The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now.

Seminar in Broome for engineers

An engineering safety seminar is being held in Broome on 4 April 2017.  The seminar is aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations.  CASA aims to support the professional development of people in these safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources.  Importantly the seminar will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA.  Topics covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and the Part 64 review.  Part 64 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations covers the requirements needed for an authorisation to operate an aeronautical radio or the authority to taxi an aeroplane.

Book a place at Broome engineering seminar.

Time to comment on maintenance engineer licence regs

Everyone in the aircraft maintenance sector is being urged to have their say on issues relating to maintenance engineer licences and ratings.  CASA is seeking comments to inform a review of Part 66 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, the Part 66 Manual of Standards and associated advisory material.  Part 66 covers aircraft maintenance engineer licensing.  The review is seeking to reduce the complexity of the maintenance licensing regulations and standards, fix anomalies and unintended consequences, remove ambiguities and provide a more progressive licensing system that includes a small aircraft licence.  It will also ensure the regulations are optimised to support the required competency outcomes and improve the way privileges are stated on licences to provide clarity. The introduction of a proposed new small aircraft maintenance licensing structure, which was to have started on 4 July 2016, has been postponed while the review is underway.  This follows requests from maintenance training organisations and aviation representative groups.  While the review is being conducted people can still gain an aircraft engineer licence for the maintenance of small aircraft using the CASA basics examinations and schedule of experience system.

Comment on the maintenance licensing review by 26 May 2017.

For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.



Senate Drone Inquiry - Public Hearing 01-17 Transcript Minutes

Senate Drone Inquiry - Public Hearing 01-17

Sensate drone hearing( 1)

CASA Briefing Newsletter - February 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]



CASA Briefing

February 2017

From acting Director of Aviation Safety and CEO, Shane Carmody

Drones - properly known as remotely piloted aircraft - are here to stay as an important and growing sector of the aviation community. As in other sectors of aviation it is CASA’s role to develop and manage appropriate safety regulations to protect people, property and other aircraft. It is also CASA’s role to educate drone operators about safety and to provide effective safety support. While Australia has had a set of drone safety regulations for many years, the rapid growth in both recreational and commercial drone use means CASA has to look for new opportunities to deliver education and safety support. I am pleased to say that is exactly what is being done with the development of a new drone app – called ‘can I fly there?’. The app will show drone no-fly zones such as aerodromes, helicopter landing areas and restricted airspace. It will also flag no-drone areas where emergency services such as firefighters are operating. Users of the app can see drone no-fly zones near their current location or enter a location where they want to operate. This initiative will help recreational and very small commercial drone flyers to stay safe in the air. Importantly, if used correctly, it will assist to keep drones away from areas where aircraft are flying at low altitudes and could be at risk of a mid-air collision. We will continue to consult with all sectors of the aviation community to get the right balance between facilitating the growth of the drone industry while maintaining safe skies for all.

On 2 February 2017 history was made with the final fitment mandate for Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) technology coming into effect for all instrument flight rules aircraft operating in Australia. This truly heralds a new era in air traffic surveillance that keeps Australian aviation at the forefront of safety. Before ADS-B Australia's electronic airspace surveillance coverage was patchy by international standards, with only around 18 per cent of the continent covered by radar. We have been progressively introducing the new technology since 2004 as we had an immediate need for air traffic surveillance that could not be easily achieved with traditional radars. Benefits of ADS-B include reduced separation standards, increased airspace efficiencies, more accurate and timely provision of directed traffic information and quicker and more accurate search and rescue alerting. It also enables us to take the next steps in air traffic management, including increases in pilot-to-pilot situational awareness through ADS-B IN cockpit displays receiving broadcasts from other ADS-B equipped aircraft in the vicinity.

I will be spending time at the Avalon Airshow and look forward to meeting as many people as possible on the CASA stand and at the events I will be attending. If you are at Avalon please take the opportunity to visit the CASA stand and discuss any aviation safety issues with our staff.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody

A photograph of Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety


Have your say on engineer licensing review

A comprehensive review of issues relating to aircraft maintenance engineer licenses and ratings is underway. The scope of the review includes Part 66 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, the Part 66 Manual of Standards and associated advisory material. Part 66 covers aircraft maintenance engineer licensing. CASA wants to hear from the aviation community about issues that should be addressed by the review, as well as ideas for possible solutions. One priority is to address issues identified under the proposed new small aircraft maintenance licensing structure. In particular, the aim is to better integrate small aircraft maintenance licences into a progressive licensing system. The introduction of the proposed new small aircraft maintenance licensing structure, which was to have started on 4 July 2016, has been postponed while the review is underway. This follows requests from maintenance training organisations and aviation representative groups. While the review is being conducted people can still gain an aircraft engineer licence for the maintenance of small aircraft using the CASA basics examinations and schedule of experience system.

Comment on the maintenance licensing review by 26 May 2017.

Hunt for new CASA boss is underway

Recruitment has formally begun for CASA’s new Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety. The chairman of CASA, Jeff Boyd, announced the Board will be conducting a thorough search to identify the best candidate to lead the organisation. The role is responsible for providing strategic leadership and management to deliver the organisation’s vision of ‘safe skies for all’. Mr Boyd said: “We’re looking for a person who has experience in leading large complex organisations, as well as an understanding of managing a diverse range of stakeholders, government process and regulatory systems. We’re also looking for someone who has a thorough understanding of the aviation or similar industries, or an ability to rapidly obtain this knowledge.” The recruitment follows the resignation of former CEO and Director Mark Skidmore in August 2016 and the appointment of Shane Carmody in an acting capacity from October 2016. Applications for the role will close on Monday 13 March 2017.

Focus on better implementation of new rules

A wide range of recommendations to improve the implementation of new aviation safety regulations have been made by the taskforce set up to solve problems with the licensing regulations. It in its final report the licensing solutions taskforce said many lessons could be learnt from its efforts over nearly a year. The taskforce worked closely with an industry advisory panel to improve the new licensing suite of regulations. This focus on consultation and collaboration between CASA and aviation industry representatives was a major factor in the taskforce’s success. Recommendations for the future of regulatory development and implementation include reviewing CASA’s stakeholder engagement, having a model of collaboration and cross functional cooperation within CASA and with the aviation community, establishing flexible teams to work on preparation activities, consulting with the aviation community to establish a clear delivery framework right from the beginning and developing guidance material and acceptable means of compliance prior to implementation of regulations. In addition all affected CASA staff must be trained on new regulations and an inspector helpline set up prior to the implementation of new regulations. An online forum to facilitate consultation between the aviation community and CASA was also recommended. CASA continues work to finalise further improvements to licensing suite of regulations.

Read the licensing taskforce report.

New drone survey takes-off

A new annual survey of certified remotely piloted aircraft operators is being conducted to capture the rapidly changing nature of this expanding sector of the aviation community. The survey will enable remotely piloted aircraft operators to provide information about their industry, helping CASA make evidence-based decisions in the future. With drone technology rapidly advancing, while becoming cheaper and more accessible, the Australian remotely piloted aircraft sector has undergone unprecedented growth in recent years. There are now more than 900 certified commercial operators around the nation—a sizable increase from the 14 in 2012. CASA is mindful of this fast-paced environment and wants to track and understand what is changing, where it is occurring and how it could affect safety. The 29 survey questions cover the previous calendar year’s operations - including the type and number of remotely piloted aircraft used, the nature of those operations, certification and staffing levels, as well as other safety-related topics. The survey is open to all holders of remotely piloted aircraft operator's certificates.

Take part in remotely piloted aircraft survey before it closes on 28 February 2017.

Thirteen pilot seminars in March 2017

CASA is holding 13 safety seminars for pilots around the nation during March 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Sunshine Coast, Albany, Caboolture, Kununurra, Tooradin, Kyneton, Mackay, Adelaide, Airlie Beach, Colac, Cooma, Kalgoorlie and Maitland. These seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now.

New engineering safety support

A new series of safety seminars for people responsible for aircraft airworthiness and maintenance begins in March 2017. Continuing airworthiness and aircraft engineering is a complex discipline which requires on going education to keep up to date with latest advances and the high level of safety knowledge required in modern aviation. These seminars are aimed at people in airworthiness roles such as engineers, the head of aircraft airworthiness and maintenance, continuing airworthiness management, air operators and training organisations. CASA aims to support the professional development of people in these safety critical roles by providing access to the latest best practice, information and resources. Importantly the seminars will also provide the opportunity to ask questions and raise issues with CASA. Topics covered will include the maintenance responsibilities of the registered operator, registration holder, responsible manager, aircraft owner and licensed aircraft maintenance engineer; defect reporting; tool control; and the Part 64 review. Part 64 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations covers the requirements needed for an authorisation to operate an aeronautical radio or the authority to taxi an aeroplane.

Book now for the Kununurra engineering safety seminar.

More comments needed on the future of medicals

Time is running down on the chance to have a say on the future of pilot medical certification. CASA needs comments from people across the aviation community on a comprehensive medical discussion paper. While some people have already sent submissions, many more are needed. The paper sets out a range of medical certification issues and puts forward a number of options. These options range from continuing existing medical requirements to developing a new medical certificate for the sport and recreational sectors. They also include re-assessing risk tolerances, streamlining certification practices, aligning sport and recreational standards and mitigating the risks of any changes through operational restrictions. The discussion paper looks at a range of other relevant issues such as CASA’s approach to aviation medicine, the approach to medical certification in four other nations, pilot incapacitation in Australia, accidents and risks, psychiatric conditions and the protection of third parties. The discussion paper makes it clear CASA’s operational objective is to strive to let as many people continue to fly as safely as possible. However, CASA is aware there is a perception from some elements of the pilot community that CASA can take an overly rigorous approach in terms of testing and contesting opinions from other doctors.

Comment on the medical discussion paper by 30 March 2017.

For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.


Notice of General Meeting - Agenda Items For Consideration.

Members,

Finalised agenda items/notices of motions as noted below are circulated to the membership for consideration:



As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Google Hangout

2:00 PM (Qld Time) Saturday 11th March, 2017

at 3 Shirley Street, Redbank Plains Qld. 4301.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. Refer Annex A.

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 16th February, 2017.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on/by the 17th February 2017 for initial consideration .

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 23rd February.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd February to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS Inc by noon 9th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary, on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

0417879416


ANNEX A:

1. 

I , John D. Taylor as a financial member of Skyraiders Inc, move a Motion that the AMAS Society call for volunteers for appointment as AMAS Inc Representatives in all States and Territories of Australia.

 Reasoning being that with the ever growing membership throughout Australia this action is warranted, and will further assist the AMAS Inc Committee to better serve our membership with more direct input from these representatives.

 As our AMAS Inc membership is comprised of R/C, C/L, F/F , Indoor and FPV fliers such Volunteer could come from any one of these disciplines which would provide an all inclusive and balanced input.

2.

From the AMAS Inc Committee.

 

Expressions of interest(EOI):

The committee finds the Society growing at a rapid rate(as has been the

case for the preceding years) and as a duty of care sees requirement for

expansion of the current knowledge/experience base to assist the AMAS

Inc Committee in management of the Society. EOI  for such

knowledge/experience being sought ranges from, but not limited to, the

following:

 

1. Society Public/Media Relations Officer.

2. Graphics Designer.

3. Television/Radio/Current Affairs.

4. Marketing/Advertising.

5. Legal.

6. Technical: Eg, Special Interest Groups.

7. Official Committee Office Bearer Positions.

8. Finance.

9. Insurance.

10. Any advisory beneficial to the progress of the Society.

 

EOI can be received via the Office of the Society Secretariat.

Notice of General Meeting.

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Google Hangout

2:00 PM (Qld Time) Saturday 11th March, 2017

at 3 Shirley Street, Redbank Plains Qld. 4301.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. Refer Annex A.

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 16th February, 2017.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on/by the 17th February 2017 for initial consideration .

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 23rd February.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 23rd February to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS Inc by noon 9th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the General Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary, on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.

0417879416


ANNEX A:

1. 

I , John D. Taylor as a financial member of Skyraiders Inc, move a Motion that the AMAS Society call for volunteers for appointment as AMAS Inc Representatives in all States and Territories of Australia.

 Reasoning being that with the ever growing membership throughout Australia this action is warranted, and will further assist the AMAS Inc Committee to better serve our membership with more direct input from these representatives.

 As our AMAS Inc membership is comprised of R/C, C/L, F/F , Indoor and FPV fliers such Volunteer could come from any one of these disciplines which would provide an all inclusive and balanced input.

2.

From the AMAS Inc Committee.

 

Expressions of interest(EOI):

The committee finds the Society growing at a rapid rate(as has been the

case for the preceding years) and as a duty of care sees requirement for

expansion of the current knowledge/experience base to assist the AMAS

Inc Committee in management of the Society. EOI  for such

knowledge/experience being sought ranges from, but not limited to, the

following:

 

1. Society Public/Media Relations Officer.

2. Graphics Designer.

3. Television/Radio/Current Affairs.

4. Marketing/Advertising.

5. Legal.

6. Technical: Eg, Special Interest Groups.

7. Official Committee Office Bearer Positions.

8. Finance.

9. Insurance.

10. Any advisory beneficial to the progress of the Society.

 

EOI can be received via the Office of the Society Secretariat.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - January 2017 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


CASA Briefing

January 2017

From acting Director of Aviation Safety and CEO, Shane Carmody

It seems every year in aviation is packed with issues to grapple with and challenges to meet and 2017 looks no different. For CASA the ongoing challenges are to strike the appropriate balance in our regulatory work, be clear and consistent, understand the impact of our decisions and be willing to consider alternative ways to achieve required safety outcomes. A lot of work continues within CASA to embed our regulatory philosophy in all aspects of our operations and decision making. This philosophy underpins all aspects of CASA’s work - making and implementing regulations, working with individuals and operators, developing safety education and support and communicating with the aviation community. I have made it very clear to everyone in CASA, not just operational staff, that the regulatory philosophy must drive everything we do.

I am pleased CASA has recently delivered on two ongoing commitments, with the release of the medical certification discussion paper in December and the first steps taken to conduct an independent review of the new fatigue rules. Both matters have been contentious, with a wide range of views expressed by people and organisations. The medical certification discussion paper covers a lot of territory. I thank the many people who have already commented and I encourage as many people as possible to read the paper and have their say. CASA will look dispassionately at the submissions and undertake an open process in determining what changes may be appropriate. We have gone to tender for the conduct of the fatigue review and will look to have the selection process finalised by March 2017 and a report delivered in the second half of the year. Finally on 2 February 2017 another longstanding initiative will have reached a milestone, with the implementation of the automatic dependent surveillance - broadcast mandate, a major improvement to Australia’s aviation safety system.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody
Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety Lo-Res


First step in fatigue rules review

In October 2016, CASA and its Board decided an independent review would be conducted of the latest fatigue rules for air operators and pilots. These rules are in Civil Aviation Order 48.1 Instrument 2013. In January 2017, CASA issued a tender to engage the services of a suitably qualified independent specialist, or team of specialists, to undertake the fatigue review. This independent review will provide CASA with an informed basis on which to finalise reform of the fatigue rules. The review has four objectives - determining if the new rules are necessary, evaluating the research and evidence used in developing the rules, evaluating how research and evidence takes into account the Australian operating environment and evaluating the extent to which the latest fatigue rules are consistent with the principles in CASA’s regulatory philosophy and the directive about the development of new regulations. The review will consider a range of issues including the standards and recommended practices of the International Civil Aviation Organization, along with the current and proposed fatigue rules of the European Aviation Safety Agency, New Zealand, the United States, United Kingdom and Canada. Other issues to be considered include the results of investigations into fatigue related accidents and incidents and the approach to fatigue regulation by other transport regulators. The terms of reference were approved by the CASA Board.

Visit the fatigue review web page on the CASA website.

R22 main rotor blade warning

A crack in an R22 main rotor blade has sparked new safety recommendations to pilots and operators. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA recommends main rotor blade inspections pay particular attention to the blade trailing edges. If there are sudden and increased vibration levels during flight the pilot should land immediately to investigate the cause, as increased vibration levels are a reason to suspect a cracked blade. The recommendations follow the discovery of main rotor blade cracking on an R22 Beta II helicopter fitted with A016-6 main rotor blades. This was found after the helicopter experienced an unusual increase in vibration levels and commenced a landing.  Shortly before making a successful landing and while in the hover the pilot reported an increase in vertical vibration levels and a decrease in power available.  Subsequent inspection revealed a crack approximately 160 mm in length emanating from the trailing edge and running chord wise toward the D section spar. The total time in service of the blade was 1782.7 hours. The manufacturer stipulates a life limit of 2200 hours or 12 years for these blades. The incident is being investigated by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau and the root cause has not yet been identified. CASA is keeping the issue under a close watch and any blade defects should be reported using the online defect reporting service.  Defects include corrosion, dents and chips, as well as any marks on the blade which may have been present at manufacture.

Read the R22 main rotor blade airworthiness bulletin.

Have your say on pilot medicals

It’s time to have your say on pilot medical certification. CASA is seeking comments on a comprehensive discussion paper setting out a range of medical certification issues and options. Six options are contained in the discussion paper, ranging from continuing existing medical requirements to developing a new medical certificate for the sport and recreational sectors. Other options include re-assessing risk tolerances, streamlining certification practices, aligning sport and recreational standards and mitigating the risks of any changes through operational restrictions. The discussion paper also looks at a range of relevant issues such as CASA’s approach to aviation medicine, the approach to medical certification in four other nations, pilot incapacitation in Australia, accidents and risks, psychiatric conditions and the protection of third parties. The discussion paper says: “CASA’s operational objective, in practice, is to develop policy and guidelines that strive to let as many people continue to fly as safely as possible. However, CASA is aware there is a perception from some elements of the pilot community that CASA can take an overly rigorous approach in terms of testing and contesting opinions from other doctors. It is difficult to determine the accuracy of the allegation of ‘over regulation’ by CASA in aviation medicine when the claims made involve the health of different individuals and the advice of different medical practitioners, some of which may involve competing opinions.”

Comment on the medical discussion paper by 30 March 2017.

New warbird rules take flight

New regulations for ex-military, replica and historic aircraft come into effect on 28 January 2017. Warbirds, which are currently operating under experimental certificates of airworthiness, will transition to a limited category airworthiness certificate.  Under a limited category certificate operational rules and airworthiness authorisations will be managed by a self-administering organisation in cooperation with CASA. Transition to the new regulations is required by 28 July 2017. A new manual of standards for the warbird, replica and historic aircraft regulations, which are in Part 132 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations, is now available. The manual of standards covers general requirements under the regulations, qualifications and experience requirements, certification and airworthiness requirements, issuing permit index numbers and historic aircraft. New definitions for design philosophy and maintenance levels are included. The manual of standards also prescribes requirements relating to the operation of aircraft, including the type of passenger warning placard that must be displayed and aerodromes unsuitable as landing areas. The new regulations require an extra safety briefing at the point of sale for any adventure flight, as well as before boarding, limits to passenger numbers and conditions for flights over populous areas. Overall, the new rules provide flexibility and certainty around the recreational use of warbirds and limited category historic or replica aircraft.

Find out more about the new warbird and historic aircraft rules.

Safety lessons for pilots

CASA is holding eight safety seminars for pilots around the nation during February 2017. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled at Devonport, Mildura, Hobart, Gympie, Bundaberg, Maryborough, Forbes and Temora. These seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft.  Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book your place for an AvSafety Seminar now

Drone regulation made easy

Three new easy to understand online resources covering the safety regulation of drones are now available. The documents provide a basic overview of the rules for all categories of drones, remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificates and the remote pilot licence. In the basic overview the new rules for very small commercial operations are set out along with the operating requirements. Very small drone operators must obtain an aviation reference number and then notify CASA at least five days before their first commercial flight. Anyone flying a drone commercially that is not operating in the very small category must obtain a remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificate. There are benefits from having a certificate such as being able to fly large drones and the ability to apply for a range of additional approvals beyond the standard operating conditions. These can allow operations such as flying at night or within three nautical miles of a controlled aerodrome. There are two ways to gain a remotely piloted aircraft pilot licence. People with no prior aviation knowledge can complete a course with an remotely piloted aircraft system training provider. If a person has already passed an aeronautical knowledge exam for a flight crew licence they only need to complete practical training with an approved training provider and log a minimum of five hours flight time.

Read the drone information sheets now.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.


AMAS Inc Committee Message 1-17

A message from the AMAS Inc Committee:

A. Please be advised that 3 new files have recently been updated or added to the AMAS website, they are:

1) AMAS Bylaws and Site Attendance form  on the documents tab.
2) AMAS Child & Youth Risk Management Policy on the documents tab.
3) Solo Control Line endorsement form on the flight training tab.

Club Committees always have the option to add tasks or conditions to pilot endorsement forms if they feel it is deemed necessary to suit the site used or to satisfy any additional safety and club requirements.

B. HobbyKing will be conducting the "HobbyKing Live 2017 Australia  show on March 25th 2017 at the Penrith Electric Model Aero Club. Event flyer can be found here. and also here.

Further information or any questions can be emailed to HKLiveAU@hobbyking.com

C. The Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc was invited to provide a submission to the senate inquiry into the regulatory requirements that impact on the safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems, unmanned aerial systems and associated systems. The accepted submission can be found here.

D. A general meeting of the Society has been called for the 11th March 2017. Agenda items are called for and further details will follow in due course(shortly).

Kind regards,

Mike Snabaitis.
Secretary on behalf of the AMAS Inc Committee.
www.amas.org.au

Flight Safety Australia January-February 2017 out now! [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


Flight Safety Australia January-February 2017 out now!

Download the magazine app on your Apple or Android device.

Flight Safety Australia image

As the biennial Australian International Airshow approaches, Flight Safety Australia’s January–February 2017 edition looks at how airshows manage risk. It’s a story of complexity—thorough planning and ongoing cooperation between CASA and the aviation industry. We also look back in time to 1972, the year that has the grim distinction of having the greatest number of airline passengers killed worldwide. Analysis of that year’s appalling record produces two conclusions: momentary congratulations at how technology and modern crew resource management techniques have lowered the fatal accident rate; and the sobering realisation that because air travel is growing rapidly, crash rates need to keep falling or the overall number of annual deaths will exceed 1972’s total. A study of high-reliability organisations in the Safety in mind series reveals how a few general principles used in operations as diverse as electricity distribution, nuclear power and aircraft carrier flight decks can make accidents rare, despite inherent and obvious risks.

US contributor Thomas P. Turner writes elegantly and convincingly on why pilots sometimes make it a point of pride to compensate for maintenance failures and oversights in aircraft—and why this is a dangerous practise. Kreisha Ballantyne explores the role of education, experience and exams in producing well-rounded and expert pilots and Adrian Park looks at the chilling story of an international airliner that nearly crashed shortly after taking off from Melbourne airport because of a data entry error. Yet older technology also has its dangers as a look at the inherent fragility of gyroscopic instruments reminds us. There is also a discussion of the people-centred safety philosophy being adopted by an Australian air carrier and reports on risk management and human factors in the sport and recreational aviation sectors.

The popular quiz and reader-submitted close calls round out a packed issue.

Don’t forget there are two ways to keep up-to-date with Flight Safety Australia’s coverage of all the latest aviation safety news and issues. Download the magazine tablet app from the App Store or from Google Play and enjoy the interactive bi-monthly magazine experience, complete with video and audio. Once you’ve downloaded the issue, you can read it offline at your leisure. And for daily aviation safety updates, as well as all the bi-monthly magazine’s articles, subscribe to the magazine’s news site: www.flightsafetyaustralia.com.


--

2016 XMAS PICTORIAL NEWSLETTER

Can be found here.

Remotely-Piloted Aircraft (RPA) Research

Advertisement  Small VLOS  Drone  Study  2b 2016 v 1. 3

Publication of AC 101-01 v2.0 - Remotely piloted aircraft systems - licensing and operations [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


AC 101-01 v2.0

CASA wishes to advise that AC 101-01 v2.0 - Remotely piloted aircraft systems - licensing and operations has been published.

This Advisory Circular (AC) was developed by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) to provide guidance to operators, remote crew, manufacturers and maintainers of drones or remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). It describes the categorisation of RPA and general requirements for use of RPAS. It also provides guidance to operators and crew on the safe and legal operation of RPA in all classes of airspace.

This AC does not provide guidance for autonomous aircraft (that is, any unmanned aircraft that cannot be managed on a real-time basis during flight).

A full list of Final Advisory Circulars can be found on the CASA website.

 

CASA Briefing Newsletter - December 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


CASA Briefing

December 2016

From acting Director of Aviation Safety and CEO, Shane Carmody

I am thoroughly enjoying my time back at CASA and I am looking forward to getting stuck into the work in 2017, assisting the aviation community to deliver the best possible safety outcomes. Since starting in October I have been looking at governance and accountability within CASA and I expect to be making some adjustments in the New Year. I have also been reviewing our performance management and training regimes and will do some fine tuning in those areas as well. I have been impressed by CASA’s strong relationships with the aviation community and encouraged by many positive messages I have received during the last two months.

I wish everyone in Australian aviation a safe and enjoyable Christmas and hope that as many people as possible can get out and go flying over the holiday period. Right across the aviation community there is a great passion for flying and the holidays are a perfect time to express this passion and share it with others. Like many organisations CASA will be taking a short break between Christmas and New Year, although we will have people on standby to meet any urgent aviation safety related requests.

Happy Christmas and best wishes for 2017 from everyone at CASA.

Shane Carmody
Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety Lo-Res


Comment now on medical certification

Australia’s aviation community is being called on to take part in a detailed discussion about the future of aviation medical certification requirements. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has issued a comprehensive discussion paper setting out a range of medical certification issues and options. This discussion paper forms the basis for any future consultation between CASA and the aviation community on potential changes to medical certification. The paper does not contain any proposals or draft regulations. Six options that may be considered for future consultation are identified, although further options will be considered on the basis of responses to the discussion paper. Options range from continuing existing medical requirements to developing a new medical certificate for the sport and recreational sectors. Other options are re-assessing risk tolerances, streamlining certification practices, aligning sport and recreational standards and mitigating the risks of any changes through operational restrictions. The discussion paper looks at a range of relevant issues such as CASA’s approach to aviation medicine, the approach to medical certification in four other nations, pilot incapacitation in Australia, accidents and risks, psychiatric conditions and the protection of third parties. CASA’s acting Director of Aviation Safety and CEO, Shane Carmody, said aviation medicine is a complex area of decision making involving medical, regulatory and legal considerations. “Due to these complexities CASA recognised a wide discussion with the aviation community is essential before any proposals for change should be considered,” Mr Carmody said.

Comments should be made before 30 March 2017.

Smart phones top dangerous goods list

Smart phones have been ranked the least wanted dangerous goods in Australian aviation for 2016. This follows an increasing number of passengers accidently crushing their phone in the reclining mechanism of their aircraft seat. This can result in the damaged smart phone battery going into thermal runaway, possibly igniting a fire.  The growing rate of these incidents has seen airlines review seat designs and update safety videos to warn passengers not to move their seat if they lose their smart phone. There were 39 reports of lost or damaged smart phones in 2016, with nine cases requiring emergency procedures. Lithium batteries and portable power packs come in at number two on the least wanted dangerous goods list with passengers still failing to carry spare batteries safely. Spare batteries must never be carried in checked luggage at any time but should be taken on board aircraft in carry-on baggage with the battery terminals protected. Hover boards have made the least wanted dangerous goods list for the first time, with passengers still packing the self-balancing scooter in luggage despite widespread warnings.. The lack of manufacturing standards for hover boards is believed to have caused several fires around the world. Compressed oxygen also makes the dangerous goods list, with passengers requiring oxygen for medical purposes failing to contact their airline before travelling. While medically required oxygen canisters are allowed on aircraft, travellers must gain approval from their airline before flying and cylinders, valves or regulators fitted on the cylinder must be protected from damage. Other least wanted dangerous goods include chainsaws, whipper snippers and other devices with internal combustion engines, gas cylinders and camping stoves, paint and paint related products, fireworks, lighters and matches.

Use the dangerous goods app before flying.

Get detailed information on lithium battery safety.

We need healthy, happy pilots

The Christmas-New Year holiday period is a great time to go flying with family and friends. Before getting behind the controls there is a lot to plan and think about and one of those is the health and well-being of the pilot. To help pilots focus on their well-being CASA has developed a suite of on-line information and advice on topics such as fatigue, diet, hydration, alcohol and other drugs and mental health. Pilots need to have the knowledge and self-awareness to monitor their own fitness and performance and address any issues that could affect safe operations. The old adage of ‘you are what you eat’ applies both on the ground and in the air.  In fact, the leading cause of pilot incapacitation over the last decade wasn’t laser pointer strikes, fatigue or hypoxia - it was upset stomachs and food poisoning. Diet can have a significant impact on how a pilot feels and performs.  Large meals require energy to digest and a full stomach draws blood away from the brain, leaving you feeling tired. Smaller meals, more often, can avoid this effect. Keeping properly hydrated is also very important, with the recommended daily amount of water around two litres, or more in physically demanding or hot conditions. Certain medications as well as alcohol and caffeine consumption can also impact hydration and performance levels.

Get the facts on pilot well-being as well as where to go for advice and support.

Flight Safety Australia annual edition in print now

Everyone who would like a high quality printed edition of the best of CASA’s Flight Safety Australia magazine should place an order now. The second annual printed edition of the Flight Safety Australia online magazine is now available. The 2016 Flight Safety Australia collectors’ edition is a bumper edition of more than 50 stories published in the online magazine during 2016. Features cover human factors, flight operations, training, maintenance and aviation medicine. There are also stories about the latest research on the risks of collision between manned aircraft and drones, the importance of human-machine interface design and how medicine uses a combination of theatrical and technical simulation to develop interpersonal skills in surgical teams. The close calls section-written by pilots who share their experiences in the name of safety-covers incidents ranging from the terrifying to the merely troubling. Close calls are in aircraft as diverse as warbirds, gliders, and business jets. This is a 168 page publication packed with great reading for everyone involved in all sectors of Australian aviation.

The 2016 Flight Safety Australia print edition costs just $15 for packing and postage and can be ordered through the CASA online store

New fatigue fee waiver

A fee waiver for a ‘like for like’ transition to a fatigue risk management system under the new fatigue rules is now available.  The fatigue risk management system fee waiver is consistent with CASA’s current practice to not charge operators transitioning to new rule sets on a ‘like for like’ basis.  The waiver applies to operators transitioning to a fatigue risk management system under Appendix 7 of the Civil Aviation Order 48.1 instrument 2013. All operators with an existing application for a fatigue risk management system have received a refund.  Fatigue risk management system applications that include a variation of scope will continue to have the relevant fees applied. In October 2016, CASA announced that the transition period for the fatigue rules would be extended by 12 months.  The extension provides more time for operators to consider their options under the Civil Aviation Order 48.1, including extra time to develop and implement a fatigue risk management system.  The extension has also provided an opportunity for CASA to conduct an independent review of the new fatigue rules.  CASA is planning to announce the terms of reference for the review in early 2017.

Learn more about the latest fatigue rule developments.

CASA closing for Christmas

Don’t forget CASA will be closed over the Christmas-New Year holiday period.  CASA services to the aviation community will be unavailable from close of business Friday 23 December 2016, until Tuesday 3 January 2017.  All services will resume from start of business on Tuesday 3 January 2017.  Anyone who anticipates needing CASA services during the holiday period should contact CASA as soon as possible.  Please contact the relevant regional office or the CASA Client Services Centre for assistance.  CASA will be available to help with urgent aviation safety matters during the Christmas-New Year period but resources are limited.  If urgent assistance is needed call 131 757 and follow the prompts.  Foreign air operators who require urgent assistance over the Christmas-New Year period should contact CASA through +61 7 3144 7400.  This is for urgent matters such as non-scheduled medical flights.  There will also be a 24 hour telephone contact for emergency or urgent airspace requests.  These can be lodged by calling +61 2 6217 1177.

Get all the details on the Christmas-New Year arrangements.

It’s easy to learn the drone rules

The unmanned sector of Australian aviation is growing and developing rapidly and everyone who operates a drone must understand the rules and their safety responsibilities. CASA has developed a new online learning tool to help both commercial and recreational drone operators to fly safely. The e-learning tool steps through the various regulations that apply to remotely piloted aircraft, with users selecting the rules relevant to their operations. The regulations are explained in plain language or can be read in extracts directly from Part 101 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. There is information on the Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operator’s Certificate and the Remote Pilot Licence. For commercial operators there is also advice on insurance and other relevant issues. The e-learning for sport and recreational drone fliers warns no matter how large a drone is or what it is used for, the first rule of flying is that it must not be operated in a way that creates a hazard to people, property or aircraft. Drones must be kept away from the approach and departure paths of aerodrome runways and landing areas.

Go to the remotely piloted aircraft systems e-learning tool

Gliders to dominate local airspace

Pilots flying in northern Victoria and southern NSW will see an increasing number of gliders in the sky in December 2016 and January 2017. The 34th Federation Aeronautique Internationale World and Continental Gliding Championships are being held at Benalla between 8 and 22 January 2017. Practice flying will get underway before the championships, with airspace being used in the Goulburn Valley, Hume, London and Mallee regions. Some pilots have already been participating in a week of coaching and training at Horsham in Victoria. There will be 114 competitors from 29 countries taking part in the championships. The event consists of a series of races around courses that are set each day depending on weather, and can range from 300km to 700km or more. Launching time will usually be between 12pm and 2pm, and it will take 10 tow planes over an hour to launch the fleet.  The gliders will return to land in the late afternoon, usually between 5:30pm and 6:30pm. All pilots flying in northern Victoria and southern NSW should take the gliding activity into account when planning operations in late 2016 and January 2017.

Find out more about the World Gliding Championships.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.




Christmas Newsletter

Information on Part 101 disallowance motion [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Information on Part 101 disallowance motion

Wednesday 23 November 2016

CASR PART 101 AMENDMENT – DISALLOWANCE MOTION WITHDRAWN

On 22 November 2016, Senator Nick Xenophon withdrew his motion to disallow Civil Aviation Legislation Amendment (Part 101) Regulation 2016 in the Australian Senate.

This means that the recent changes to the safety regulations covering the operation of drones or remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) remain in place.

The amendment, which commenced on 29 September 2016, includes updated terminology and introduces an excluded RPA category with reduced regulatory requirements for commercial operators flying RPA smaller than 2 kilograms and some landowners and leaseholders carrying out commercial-like operations on their land.

For details on the recent changes, guidance and general information on RPA operations in Australia, including an eLearning module suitable for all operators visit www.casa.gov.au/rpa, phone 131 757 or email rpas@casa.gov.au.



CASA Briefing Newsletter - November 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]


CASA Briefing

November 2016

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

My first weeks in the role as CASA’s acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety have been very busy, with visits to most of our offices and meetings with a range of people and organisations across the aviation community. CASA faces many challenges in today’s aviation environment and discussing issues and listening to feedback is one of the keys to finding the right responses to these challenges.  I have made it very clear I intend to lead CASA to be a firm, fair and balanced regulator. We need to get the right safety outcomes without unintended consequences, unreasonable requirements or unnecessary costs to the aviation community. It is not an easy balance to strike, yet that is our job. Of course, this doesn’t mean CASA must be a ‘heavy-handed’ regulator either - our intention is to keep everyone flying in a safe environment. To achieve this, we need to work hard to ensure we have a robust and effective safety system that allows risks to be identified without sanction, and addressed quickly. A system that only interferes with the legitimate day-to-day activities of the aviation community when necessary and in the interests of safety. This balancing act between a weak regulator and a harsh binary (black and white) regulator is a fair but firm regulator.

I made these points in a speech to the Regional Airlines Association of Australia, where I stated I was absolutely confident of the support of the CASA Board in this approach. I also said I look forward to the support of the aviation community to contribute to this significant commitment through a collaborative and co-operative approach. To ensure we harness the support of the aviation community I will continue to meet with people and organisations from across all sectors to listen to ideas and concerns.  As my predecessor made clear on many occasions, CASA doesn’t have all the answers and isn’t the source of all aviation safety wisdom. We are continuing to work hard on key areas such aviation medicals, fatigue regulation and regulatory reform to take into account the various views from across the aviation community while striving for the best possible safety outcomes.

Please read my speech in full.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody
Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety Lo-Res


Runway strips not for normal ops

Pilots are being reminded that runway strips should not normally be used for landings and taking offs. Concerns have been raised with CASA about pilots using the grass or dirt surface next to a sealed runway surface, inside the gable markers, for standard operations. This is not the usual intention of the runway strip area. The purpose of the runway strip is to reduce the risk of damage to an aircraft if it runs off a runway and to protect aircraft flying over it during take-off or landing operations. This purpose is set out in the Civil Aviation Safety Regulation Part 139 manual of standards. Clearly, this does not imply suitability for normal aircraft operations. However, this does not prevent an aerodrome operator preparing a runway strip for landings and take-offs if they choose. When considering using a runway strip for landings or take-offs pilots should first check in the En Route Supplement Australia (ERSA) if the runway strip is suitable for operations or directly contact the aerodrome operator. Unless it is clear the runway strip is suitable for normal operations it should not be used. An example of where a runway strip can be used for normal operations is Temora aerodrome. This runway strip has been prepared and maintained for glider operations and is also available for use by tailwheel aircraft. The availability of the runway strip for these operations is notified in ERSA.

Find out more in the Part 139 manual of standards.

Private aircraft have longer to fit ADS-B

Changes have been made to the requirements for fitting and using Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast equipment (ADS-B) in private aircraft.  Private aircraft flying under the instrument flight rules will now have longer to fit ABS-B equipment - with the deadline extended from 2 February 2017 to 1 January 2020. This aligns with the ADS-B deadline in the United States. However, aircraft conducting private operations under the instrument flight rules without ADS-B will be subject to a number of conditions. They will be required to operate below 10,000 feet in uncontrolled class G airspace and in class D airspace they will be subject to air traffic control clearance. They can only operate in class C and E airspace to facilitate arrival or departure from a class D aerodrome, with prior clearance from air traffic control and only if fitted with a secondary surveillance radar transponder. The new ADS-B deadline for private operations will mean the remaining aircraft can be fitted with the equipment in an orderly manner - reducing the burden on owners, operators and avionics suppliers.  All Australian regular public transport, charter and aerial work aircraft must still be fitted with ADS-B equipment by 2 February 2017.  To date 88 per cent of instrument flight rules operations are conducted in aircraft fitted with ADS-B. This is anticipated to increase to 94 per cent by February 2017. Aircraft flying under the visual flight rules are not required to fit ADS-B equipment.

CASA’s acting Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody, said the changes to ADS-B requirements will benefit a small number of private aircraft operators who have not yet been able to fit the equipment while ensuring safety. “CASA continues to strongly encourage all aircraft owners and operators to fit ADS-B equipment due to the many safety benefits this technology provides. ADS-B provides better air traffic information outside controlled airspace, greater ability to avoid bad weather, more accurate and faster search and rescue and more direct flight paths.&rdquo. CASA is also making a provision for a very small number of foreign registered aircraft to continue operating without ADS-B until the European deadline of 6 June 2020, subject to air traffic control clearances and flying under 29,000 feet in continental airspace.

Commitment to collaboration and service

CASA’s Board chairman Jeff Boyd has given a commitment to a continuing focus on collaboration with the aviation community while ensuring service delivery obligations are met. The commitment was delivered in CASA’s latest annual report. Mr Boyd said CASA will be a regulator that listens and develops safety partnerships that benefit everyone. “The travelling public and people in the aviation community expect safety to come first for all sectors of aviation,” Mr Boyd said in the 2015-16 annual report. “CASA was cognisant of the need to keep the regulatory burden as reasonable as possible to get the right safety outcomes without unintended consequences, unreasonable requirements or unnecessary costs. However, increasing the pace of change associated with the reform of regulation can be a source of regulatory burden. CASA will continue to strive for an appropriate balance. I believe that the aviation community generally welcomes the better regulation reforms and would like to see more tangible progress in a shorter period of time, but it recognises that better regulation is also about cultural change, which will not happen overnight.”

Go to CASA’s 2015-16 annual report.

Plan your aviation Christmas now

CASA will be closing as usual for the Christmas-New Year holiday period. That means CASA services to the aviation community will be unavailable from close of business Friday 23 December 2016, until Tuesday 3 January 2017. All services will resume from start of business on Tuesday 3 January 2017. Anyone who anticipates needing CASA services during the holiday period should contact CASA well before the closure. Please contact the relevant regional office or the CASA Client Services Centre for the assistance you require. CASA will be available to help with urgent aviation safety matters during the Christmas-New Year period but resources are limited. If urgent assistance is needed call 131 757 and follow the prompts. Foreign air operators who require urgent assistance over the Christmas-New Year period should contact CASA through +61 7 3144 7400. This is for urgent matters such as non-scheduled medical flights. There will also be a 24 hour telephone contact for emergency or urgent airspace requests. These can be lodged on +61 2 6217 1177.

Get all the details on the Christmas-New Year arrangements.

Office of Airspace Regulation review positive

A comprehensive review of the operations and functions of CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation has been released. The review found the current structure of the Office of Airspace Regulation and allocation of responsibilities and tasks is sound. It also found the Office of Airspace Regulation was generally effective and efficient, although improvements can be made to processes, tools and systems. A total of ten recommendations were made in the report, with a suggested timeframe for implementation. Recommendations include the development of a strategic work plan, greater standardisation of airspace studies, setting up an airspace classifications database, strengthening key performance indicators and greater identification of future challenges such as unmanned aircraft. The report also made two recommendations in relation to Regional Airspace and Procedures Advisory Committees (RAPACs) based on feedback from members. Some RAPAC members said in submissions to the review there was frustration at getting issues resolved. The review recommends CASA set up an online portal to direct people to the appropriate consultative forum to raise a specific issue or topic. It also recommends investigating the benefits of having a nationally elected RAPAC representative to be a part of CASA’s other national consultative forums.

Read the full Office of Airspace Regulation review.

Videos explain new licensing regs

A package of five online videos covering essential elements of the new flight crew licensing and training regulations is now available. The videos provide an overview of the new regulations, managing training, competency based training, safety management systems and helicopter training. They explain the reasons and approaches behind the new licensing and training regulations and set out the support and tools CASA is providing for transition by the aviation community. The videos feature of a range of people from aviation organisations across Australia who talk about how they are working with the new regulations and the benefits flowing to their operations. One chief pilot says the new licensing requirements in Part 61 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations provide flexibility, while a chief executive officer of a flying school says they provide a stronger framework. Another chief pilot says it is not difficult to develop competency based training. In relation to safety management systems, a chief pilot states they add value to business. The head of training and checking of a large helicopter operator says they have been working collaboratively with CASA on the transition to the new training regulations.

Watch the licensing and training videos now.

Better rules for warbirds

New rules regulating the operations of ex-military, certain historic and replica aircraft will come into effect early in 2017. The rules are in Part 132 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. They apply to the owners, operators, and pilots of limited category aircraft. The new rules also affect individuals and organisations that sell and conduct adventure flights in warbirds. There are important administrative and safety enhancements to the previous regulatory requirements for these operations and the new rules provide more flexibility and clarity around recreational use and operational limits. People who currently hold an experimental certificate for ex-military aircraft will need to transition to a limited category certificate. The regulations introduce new permissions for air racing, glider towing and personal flights. For paying passengers of adventure flights in warbirds, the rules bring in a requirement for an additional safety briefing at the point of sale for the flight. They also set out the qualifications an individual must hold and the procedures that must be followed to issue certification, advice and approvals for modifications, damage and repairs for limited category aircraft. Transition to the new limited category rules will begin on 28 January 2017 and end on 28 July 2017.

Learn more about the new limited category regulations.

Bunbury lucky last 2016 pilot safety seminar

Bunbury in Western Australia will the last location to host a safety seminar for pilots in 2016. The Bunbury lessons for life seminar will be held on Wednesday 14 December at 18:30 at the Quality Hotel Lighthouse. Issues to be covered will include fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. Lessons will be learnt from accidents, with everyone asked to consider how accidents could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. The Bunbury seminar provides an important opportunity for local pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Book a place now at the Bunbury seminar.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefingon the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.


Flight Safety Australia November-December 2016 issue 113 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Flight Safety Australia November-December 2016 issue 113 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Flight Safety Australia November–December 2016 out now!

Download the magazine app on your Apple or Android device

FSA 113

In our final issue for 2016, Flight Safety Australia looks west, to see how offshore and fly-in-fly-out operations in mineral-rich Western Australia are handling the end of the minerals boom. The pressures of the boom have eased, but the subtle pressures of relative austerity may be lining up to replace them.

The November-December edition continues FSA’s focus on electric aircraft development, where distinct signs are emerging that manned electric aircraft and drones will use many of the same technologies. Related is an overview of the hazards and potential of lithium batteries, which ponders the implications of a ‘lithium economy’ for air transport. The series investigating important safety ideas, ‘Safety in Mind’, continues with an examination of sensemaking theory, and how it can explain and influence individual and organisational behaviour.

Contributor Adrian Park dissects the 2013 crash of an Airbus A310 night freighter at Birmingham, Alabama, US, and finds a story of procedural drift and chronic fatigue. Thomas P. Turner analyses the aerodynamics of a common, but underestimated manoeuvre— the go-around; and Kreisha Ballantyne assesses what it means to be truly current as a pilot. A maintenance story focuses on the importance and difficulty of detecting cracks in the popular Rolls-Royce 250 turboshaft engine—its title, Big Bang Theory, is a strong clue as to what can happen if this is not done well.

‘More than a mouthful’ covers the subject of aviation dentistry, important because of the proven links between dental health and general health. Keeping your smile in good health could also be good for your medical clearance.

The popular quiz and reader-submitted close calls round out a packed issue.

Don’t forget there are two ways tokeep up-to-date with Flight Safety Australia’s coverage of all the latest aviation safety news and issues. Download the magazine tablet app from the App Store or from Google Play and enjoy the interactive bi-monthly magazine experience, complete with video and audio. Once you’ve downloaded the issue, you can read it offline at your leisure. And for daily aviation safety updates, as well as all the bi-monthly magazine’s articles, subscribe to the magazine’s news site: www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/subscribe


CASA Briefing Newsletter - October 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From acting CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Shane Carmody

I am very pleased to be back at CASA after leaving more than seven years ago. The CASA Board has asked me to step in as Acting Chief Executive Officer and Director of Aviation Safety while the recruitment process for permanently filling the position is underway. It is expected this process will run until well into 2017, with an international and domestic search being conducted. I will continue Mark Skidmore’s commitment to regularly meeting people and organisations across the aviation community to listen to ideas, issues and concerns. Over almost two years Mark implemented a wide range of important changes in CASA, including the renewing CASA program, the restructuring of numerous positions and engaging a new management team. I intend to continue to implement his key reforms. I am mindful of the need to avoid disrupting CASA’s day-to-day operations as we continue to focus on maintaining, enhancing and promoting aviation safety.

The Minister for Infrastructure and Transport, Darren Chester, has made it clear to me the implementation of the reforms contained in the Government’s response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review remains the highest priority. The Government expects CASA to finish implementing required reforms by the end of this year, except where CASA and the aviation community have agreed that implementation should be deferred. A majority of the changes flowing from the Aviation Safety Regulation Review have already been put in place and work on the remaining reforms is progressing well. In addition to the Review, there are a number of other important matters I intend to focus on over the next few months. I am committed to delivering positive outcomes from reforms that will benefit people and organisations across the aviation community while achieving the best possible safety outcomes.

Best wishes
Shane Carmody
Shane Carmody Acting Chief Executive
Officer and Director of Aviation Safety Lo-Res


Better service via electronic forms

Work is underway to make major improvements to CASA’s delivery of regulatory services. An important part of the changes will be the introduction of more online forms, which will be rolled out progressively from 2017. Forms to go online include the aviation reference number application, pilot licencing notification, air operator certificate and certificate of approval renewal and aircraft registration. These forms will be interactive and dynamic to save time and improve accuracy. Other benefits include faster turnaround times for completing and processing forms, the automation and simplification of business processes and reducing the amount of paperwork the aviation community has to manage. Where possible forms will be consolidated to create further efficiencies. Business processes within CASA are being re-engineered to improve efficiency and the management of workloads, with the aim of reducing service delivery times and providing better outcomes for the aviation community. CASA will consult with the aviation community during the development of the electronic forms, including conducting structured user acceptance testing, to make sure the new forms deliver the planned improvements.

New defect reporting service starts

A new CASA Defect Reporting Service has been launched. It provides enhanced functionality and allows the aviation community to access more information on defects. The new system replaces the former Service Difficulty Reporting system. CASA uses defect reports as a means of identifying trends in design and maintenance reliability, as well as to develop publications such as Airworthiness Directives and Airworthiness Bulletins. The new system represents a change of focus in defect reporting. New functionality adds more value to the system and improves ease of use to ensure more defects are reported. This will provide valuable information for not only CASA but the global aviation community as the information can be more effectively shared. The new system allows anyone to search and view defect report summaries. People who need to submit defects are asked to register, with the process of submitting reports now more streamlined as some fields are pre-populated depending on the information being entered. Users can subscribe to areas of interest such as engine type or part numbers with information automatically sent on new defect reports.

Go to the new defect reporting service.

Licensing taskforce winding down

The taskforce set up to address issues in the new licensing suite of regulations is formally winding down. CASA established the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations Part 61 taskforce in November 2015, with a list of 99 issues identified through a range of industry feedback. The taskforce worked with an industry advisory panel, representing a new and extremely productive way of CASA co-operating with the aviation community. This involved validating and prioritising the 99 initial issues, as well as identifying additional issues for resolution. Over the last 11 months CASA has worked to deliver a range of solutions including guidance material and document templates for flying training organisations, changes to the flight review and instrument proficiency check policies and a range of instruments and exemptions to allow the smooth continuation of operations until the regulations themselves are amended. Amendments to the Part 61 Manual of Standards are expected to be published in early 2017. In the first half of 2017 the aviation community will also be invited to comment on a proposed regulation amendment package before it is implemented. The closure of the taskforce does not mark the end of CASA’s work to resolve a small number of outstanding issues with the licensing suite. Work is continuing on the development of the flight examiner rating course, which is expected to provide better support for flight examiner candidates. The new course will combine online learning, face-to-face teaching, a candidate interview and a flight test. Any remaining, lower-priority issues will continue to be addressed as part of CASA’s normal business. The final taskforce closure report will be published on the CASA website once it has been endorsed by the industry advisory panel.

Keep up to date with the Part 61 taskforce.

New managers take the reins

Five appointments to senior management roles within CASA have been made recently. They are Fred van der Heide as regional manager Sydney, Gerard Nolan as regional manager northern Australia, Anthony Green as regional manager Western Australia, Andrew Tiede as manager Air Navigation, Airspace and Aerodromes and Mark Sullivan as Client Services Manager. Fred van der Heide joined CASA as a flying operations inspector after a career as a line pilot and then training and checking captain. Gerard Nolan came to CASA as an airworthiness inspector after working as an engineering manager and chief engineer and owning an aircraft maintenance business. Gerard has also owned and operated general aviation aircraft. Anthony Green previously worked in air traffic control and aerodrome management and has a private pilot licence. Andrew Tiede worked for Airservices Australia in senior management roles before joining CASA. Mark Sullivan has a background in project planning and delivery, along with process and service reform, having worked for PwC Australia. Mark is involved in recreational aviation.

Some changes have also been made to the geographic areas of responsibility of CASA’s regional offices. CASA’s Northern Region now covers the northern half of Queensland, most of the Northern Territory and some of north-west Western Australia. The Western Region includes most of Western Australia, all of South Australia, a part of southern Northern Territory and parts of western Victoria and NSW.

Find a map of CASA’s regions.

High take up of ADS-B

The take up rate of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technology by aircraft owners and operators remains high. More than 1,800 Australian registered instrument flight rules aircraft are now fitted with ADS-B equipment, with a further 380 non-instrument flight rules aircraft having voluntarily fitted the equipment. All pilots and operators of instrument flight rules aircraft should ensure they are equipped with ADS-B before 2 February 2017 if they wish to continue to fly under the instrument flight rules from this date. ADS-B technology has been gradually introduced in Australian skies over a number of years to supersede the legacy radar system, enabling far greater surveillance coverage across Australia and introducing a range of improved safety and efficiency benefits. Benefits for pilots of ADS-B equipped aircraft include reduced separation and direct tracking in controlled airspace, safety alerts and improved assistance for weather diversions and emergencies. The benefits will be optimised by having all instrument flight rules aircraft using the same technology. This upgrade in surveillance technology is an important way Australia and the world is future-proofing the skies for an ever-increasing volume of air traffic.

Find more information on ADS-B.

More time for fatigue rule implementation

The implementation period for new fatigue regulations has been extended by one year. Air operators will now have until 1 May 2018 to transition to the provisions of Civil Aviation Order 48.1. The implementation period extension is in response to extensive feedback from the aviation community. This feedback indicated there was a need for CASA to provide more support through education and information on the new fatigue rules. Air operators also wanted more time to consider their options under the new rules, with a number asking for extra time to develop and implement fatigue risk management systems. CASA is in the process of developing additional and revised guidance material on the fatigue changes. In addition, the extended transition period will be used to conduct an independent and comprehensive review of fatigue limits. CASA is committed to modernising and improving the safety regulation of fatigue and is encouraging a continued focus on fatigue management by air operators. Air operators that have already transitioned to the fatigue rules in CAO 48.1 can continue to operate under the new provisions. CASA will continue to support air operators that are in the process of transitioning to CAO 48.1, including trials of fatigue risk management systems. In preparation to operate under CAO 48.1 air operators are required to submit their draft operations manual changes or an application for a fatigue risk management system to CASA by 31 October 2017.

Read more about the fatigue rules implementation

Package of drone videos now online

There’s now a package of videos online to assist people flying drones to follow the safety rules. A new video is aimed at people flying commercial drones weighing less than two kilograms maximum take-off weight. Two other videos are targeted at people flying their drones for fun – one setting out the rules for all recreational flyers and the other an animation aimed at young people taking to the skies for the first time. The new video for operators of less than two kilogram commercial drones explains how the recent changes to the regulations reduce red tape and costs while protecting safety. People and organisations in this category no longer need a remotely piloted aircraft operator’s certificate and a remote pilot’s licence. However, these drones must only be flown according to a strict set of operating conditions. Less than two kilogram operators must obtain an aviation reference number from CASA and then fill out and submit an online notification form setting out their contact details and nature of operations. These operators are warned about the need to protect aviation safety at all times, as they share airspace with manned aircraft. If drone operators see an aircraft nearby they are instructed to land immediately.

Watch the drone videos now.

Time for pilots and engineers to learn

There will be 14 safety seminars for pilots around the nation during November 2016. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled for Perth, Gawler, Warnervale, Naracoorte, Mt Gambier, Mittagong, Lethbridge, Latrobe, Coffs Harbour, Murray Bridge, Port Macquarie, Bairnsdale, Warrnambool and Kalgoorlie. These seminars will focus on fuel management and handling partial power loss in a single engine aircraft. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as the cause of a high number of accidents. Lessons will be learnt from accidents, with everyone asked to consider how the accident could have been avoided. Other issues may be discussed such as electronic flight bags, regulatory changes, correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes and the requirements for automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast. The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Four engineering knowledge development seminars are being held during November 2016. They will be take place at Launceston, Perth, Jandakot and Hobart. These seminars will focus on professional development, continuing airworthiness, certification, maintenance licensing and ageing aircraft. They are ideal learning opportunities for everyone involved in aviation maintenance, with lots of opportunities to ask questions and provide feedback to CASA.

Get more information on seminars and book a place now.

Safe operation of manned balloons

Advice on manned free balloon maintenance and the safe operation of inflation fans has been issued by CASA. The maintenance advice covers manned free balloon airworthiness standards, maintenance schedules, repairs, maintenance certification and maintenance records. Manned balloons are classified as class B aircraft and are required to have a maintenance schedule, which can be the manufacturers or an approved system of maintenance. Major balloon repairs may only be performed under the control of an appropriate certificate of approval holder. Eleven recommended safe operating procedures for inflation fans are set out in the manned balloon advisory circular. Fan blades or propellers should be protected by a guard, grill or cage so clothing, hair or loose items cannot be drawn in and tangled in moving parts. Fans should be clearly marked with signs or placards indicating danger and the need to keep clear and all fans should be fitted with a kill switch facilitating an instant shut down. The immediate area surrounding an operating fan should be marked with a safety cone or cones and/or barrier to define an exclusion zone for all but trained personnel and during operation the fan should be placed so that the pilot-in-command or a trained person attending the fan can easily reach the kill switch. Passengers should be briefed to stay clear of the fan while it is running and not to approach the fan wearing loose items of clothing or scarves.

Read the manned balloon advisory.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.

CASA INFORMATION ON PART 101 DISALLOWANCE MOTION.

Information on Part 101 disallowance motion

Wednesday 19 October 2016

Amendments to the unmanned aircraft regulations in Part 101 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 commenced on 29 September 2016.   Details can be found on the CASA website.

These amendments introduced a number of changes, including categories for excluded remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), commonly referred to as drones. These changes allow for the operation of a small or medium RPA by a landowner/occupier and RPAs weighing less than 2kg - without the operator holding an operating certificate or remote pilot licence (other than for a medium excluded RPA), as long as they meet the ‘standard RPA operating conditions’.

The making of regulations is subject to the Legislation Act 2003, which also provides for their disallowance. Under that Act, a member of the Senate or the House of Representatives may give notice of a motion to disallow regulations. On 10 October 2016, a notice of motion to disallow the Part 101 amendment regulations was given and reported by the media. This motion is expected to be debated in Parliament in late November 2016.

The CASA-industry Standards Consultative Committee (SCC) has been notified and CASA will provide RPA operators with updates about possible impacts of the disallowance motion when more information becomes available. Until then, the amendments made to Part 101 remain in effect and they should continue to be followed by all operators.

More information about the disallowance process can be found on the Parliament of Australia website.


A Civil Aviation Safety Authority Message.



https://www.facebook.com/CivilAviationSafetyAuthority/posts/554491211410571

Did you know drone flights over Sydney Harbour are prohibited?

Sydney Harbour and its surrounding areas, including Middle Harbour, White Bay, Rose Bay and the Parramatta River up to the Ryde Bridge, is restricted airspace due to the helicopters and seaplanes that have permission to fly there.

All other aircraft—including drones—are prohibited from flying in these areas unless they have permission from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

We’re currently investigating the potential for an app, hopefully being released in 2017, showing drone owners where they can and can’t fly. Until then, here’s a map illustrating restricted airspace around Sydney Harbour.

You must also follow other drone safety rules, available atcasa.gov.au/drone

'You can't fly a drone over Sydney Harbour without first gaining permission from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.  More safety information available at casa.gov.au/drone'
'Restricted airspace over Sydney Harbour. More safety information available at casa.gov.au/drone'

Gosford Flyin Oct 2016

Gosford  Flyin  Oct 2016

PEMAC Freedom of Flight - Hart Field

Friends and family of PEMAC.
This November on Saturday the 12th we are having some twilight flying BBQ, tall stories around the fire and camping.
Sunday the 13th is the fun flying. Join in on the fun with a glider competition, aerobatics, combat, limbo and spot landing.
BBQ lunch and drinks available.

Freedom of  Flight event 2016

CASA eLearning module for drone rules (Part 101) [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

**CASA eLearning module for drone rules (Part 101)**

Friday 23 September 2016

Just as there are road rules, there are also rules governing the
operation of drones, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPA). New rules for
RPA will come into effect in Australia on 29 September, 2016.

To help people understand the new rules, CASA has produced an online
eLearning module suitable for anyone wanting to fly an RPA either
recreationally or commercially in Australia.

The module explains operator and remote pilot responsibilities in
relation to these rules in plain English. The easy navigation allows
you to access just the key safety messages or delve deeper into the
details. It also contains links to specific regulations and other
related websites for more information.

Access the CASA Part 101 eLearning module
<http://mailinglist.casa.gov.au//lt.php?id=bRoGUA0PUlIAC1cYCQYOGlUHVlZXDA%3D%3D>

The amended rules also introduce new requirements for licensing and
certification of RPA operators in some categories. Holders of a
CASA-issued UAV operator’s certificate (UOC) can continue to operate
as per their current certificate and will only be issued the new RPA
operator’s certificate (ReOC) after 29 September 2016 if their
current certificate is varied or requires renewal.

UAV Controllers can continue to operate under the conditions of their
current certification, or can choose to apply for a new remote pilot
licence (RePL).

More details on the new rules are now available on the CASA website
<http://mailinglist.casa.gov.au//lt.php?id=bRoGUA0PUlIAC1YYCQYOGlUHVlZXDA%3D%3D>
.




AMAS Inc AGM/GM September 2016

Draft AC 101-10 v1.0

 CASA wishes to advise that Draft AC 101-10 v1.0 - Remotely piloted aircraft systems - operation of excluded RPA (other than model aircraft) has been published for public consultation.

The purpose of this AC is to provide guidance for operators, remote pilots and other remote crew on the applicable regulations for the safe operation of excluded RPA.

Comments are to be forwarded to the Project Leader, Craig Brown by close of business 9 September 2016.

AMAS AGM/GM Nominations and Notices of Motion

Members,

Please be advised:

No amendments were received and the finalised Notices of Motions (Annex A) are noted below  for  members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer (voting@amas.org.au) at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 2nd September. Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

Nominations received for office bearers are as follows:

President: Mr Shane Hunter

Vice President: Mr John Taylor

Secretary: Mr Michael Snabaitis 

Treasurer: Mr Robert Orrock

Committee: Mr Phillip Poole

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS inc Committee.

0417879416

ANNEX A.

 

(1) Notice of motion:

From Mr Richard Brown a financial member of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc : 

The motion is to introduce a non-mandatory Flight Proficiency re currency in complementing the existing Solo and Advanced ratings. The purpose of this re currency is to amend the wings system to reflect a member’s current flying proficiency.

It will not change the existing Solo or Advanced wings rating but it will give the individual a way to test, track and record their current flight proficiency and it demonstrates that they take their own and other people’s safety seriously. It also provides a simple method when visiting other clubs to show your current flying proficiency.

This simple task will not be compulsory and the AMAS will simply record this re currency as a service to its members. However, everyone would be encouraged to do their MPR (Model Pilot Rating) assessment yearly.

It is proposed that the new rating will be called a Model Pilot Rating(MPR) and it differs significantly from existing wings in that it is dated and is a live document, meaning continually updatable.

The task would consist of three consecutive take offs, single circuits and landings coming to a complete stop in a controlled manner on the strip with any type of aircraft. Some risk assessment skills will also be required. It would be assessed under the normal AMAS Flight Proficiency assessment system.

Initially, every member would receive an MPR carrying an endorsement of “untested”. Following an MPR assessment an updated re currency would be attached to the rating. The endorsement would indicate the result of the most recent flight test by the assessor such as, but not limited to, Solo fixed wing 2016 (Solo FW 16) or, Requires Assistance (RA 16) or, requires buddy box (RBB 16) or heavy model 2016 (Solo HM 16) or multi rotor 2016 (Solo MR 16) etc. A member may self-assess that they require assistance ie for the beginner."


(2) Notice of motion:

From Skyraiders. financial members of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc: 

Skyraiders  Miniature Aerosports Society wish to add/amend the  flying Assessments and training system used for the purpose of qualifying for all forms of R/C  Flight Proficiency scheme. 

Add to all the Training/Guidance/Assessment Material  currently available  on the AMAS website that all new technologies incorporating, for example 3 axis flight stabilisation  available now or in the future be permitted to be used to assist the pilot in command of various types of models.

Eg but not limited to  Roll, Pitch, Yaw control

 Rationale behind this motion, is use of this technology may allow  novice or cognition challenged  pilots to gain confidence more quickly, intermediate flyers  have an alternate avenue to advance quicker,  scale pilots flying more unstable variants may have less problems and older pilots with failing eyesight or other disabilities of older age may  be assisted through safer model aircraft operation therefore mitigating risk.

Pilots with Physical Disabilities  may also then enjoy our wonderful hobby using modern technology

We already have electronic programmable onboard systems on F/F models to control features such as Delayed Propeller Start, Auto Rudder, Variable Incidence Tail , Variable Incidence Wing, Wing Waggler, Remote Dethermaliser, Electronic Trackers and more recently Radio Assist and GPS finders.

 Many C/L models now have Programmable ESC controlling motor speed and power outputs at different aspects of flight, as well as R/C throttle control and  multiple servos operating the many similar functions as Scale aircraft use eg, smoke, flaps, undercarriage retacts to name just a few. 

We have gyros etc on helicopters to assist maintain stability of the craft. Multirotors are fitted with flight controllers

 The modern transmitter has many programmable features to assist the pilot with easier and safer

manoeuvres and operations

Furthermore an ever increasing number of RTF, ARF, Bind and Fly, PNP models are  already available for purchase with these features as standard. 

We now present this as a formal motion for voting by the AGM/General Meeting

 

(3) Notice of Nomination for Life member:

From  Michael Snabaitis. 

For the consideration of the AMAS Inc membership:

I, Michael Snabaitis, a financial member of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc hereby nominate:

Mr John Taylor for Life membership to the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc.

As a founding member of AMAS who has a significant record of attending various events and competing in Australia and overseas. Also within the activities of the association of which could not be more longstanding. Much, if not all, of the AMAS history and culture is embodied in John  and the contributions outlined below.

For his significant contribution to the sport of Aeromodelling. 

Sustained and unmatched contribution to the AMAS Inc on multiple platforms over a sustained period of time.

John’s leadership of the AMAS evident at committee and a more personal level.

John’s key contribution here was his commitment to nurturing new Aeromodellers and the way he institutionalised this commitment through AMAS  processes. 

John  has an almost unique ability to move easily amongst the various facets of Aeromodelling and share a commitment to Aeromodelling and Aeromodelling learning regardless of the technologies and sometimes complicated understandings  that are inherent in this day and age.

All of the attributes and examples  outlined above are evidence of John’s service to the AMAS and previous  over a period of time that extends well beyond his formal service as President. He has always been strongly committed to fostering collective expertise by working closely with individuals in ways that increase their influence and personal capacity. Through this service, he has added substantial value to individuals as well as AMAS  as an organisation.


(4) Notice of Motion 

From the AMAS Inc Committee.
That the current Incorporated Club Membership yearly fee of ten dollars be increased to twenty five dollars to align with insurance premium increases over the last four years.
If accepted, this revised club membership fee would  commence 1st July 2017.

9th Annual Worldwide Ringmaster Fly-A-Thon

I want to invite you and your fellow Control Line modeling enthusiasts to
join us this Fall by flying in the 9th Annual Worldwide
Ringmaster Fly-A-Thon on October 1st and 2nd.

Your help last year put us way over the top with record numbers of
flights and pilots! With your help again this year we can match or exceed
last year's records (3487 flights by 684 pilots)!

This event is the largest Control Line Fun-Fly in the World and year after
year the Fly-A-Thon has demonstrated that the Control Line modeling hobby
is loved around the globe!!

I have attached three versions of the informational flyer (image, PDF and
MS Word) that you may use to promote the event. Feel free to translate the
flyer into your own native language and please circulate it to other fliers
that you feel might wish to participate. You might want to organize a
contest such as the Ringmaster Roundup that is held in the Houston,Texas
area or just have a fun-fly at your field. Some fliers prefer to fly alone
trying to beat some personal goal and that is great too. If you are a
member of a model airplane club try to get your club involved even if it
is primarily a Radio Control Club. Our local club prohibits RC flying
while we hold the Ringmaster Fly-A-Thon but if there is room at your field
you may be able to have both types of flying going on at the same time.

NOTE: This year we are requiring a minimum of 5 laps to count as an
official flight!

This will level the playing field for those that want to compare their
numbers with those of others. This rule does not apply for new pilots who
have never soloed before the Fly-A-Thon. On the other hand, I don't
remember the record number of laps reported for a single flight but you
may wish to try for a large lap number this year. Long flight or short
we are all celebrating the wonderful hobby of Control Line Modeling by
flying some form of Ringmaster in the 9th Fly-A-Thon!!

You can address questions to me and you may use either the e-mail address
on the flyer or my personal address used to send this message.

The Fly-A-Thon is sponsored by the Brotherhood of the Ring Forum
[1]. Feel free to register to join the Brotherhood Forum and you may
also wish to visit/join the Facebook Group, Annual Worldwide Ringmaster
Fly-A-Thon [2] (you will have to be a member on Facebook to join the
Group).

Tight lines and soft landings,

JOHN CRALLEY, FOR THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE RING

Links:
------
[1] http://brotherhoodofthering.info/
[2] https://www.facebook.com/groups/RingmasterFlyAThon/

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS-FOR DISCUSSION.

Members,

Please be advised:

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting. 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 3rd August  2016.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 4th August  2016 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 17th August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 17th August  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 2nd September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS inc Committee.

0417879416

ANNEX A.

 

(1) Notice of motion:

From Mr Richard Brown a financial member of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc : 

The motion is to introduce a non-mandatory Flight Proficiency re currency in complementing the existing Solo and Advanced ratings. The purpose of this re currency is to amend the wings system to reflect a member’s current flying proficiency.

It will not change the existing Solo or Advanced wings rating but it will give the individual a way to test, track and record their current flight proficiency and it demonstrates that they take their own and other people’s safety seriously. It also provides a simple method when visiting other clubs to show your current flying proficiency.

This simple task will not be compulsory and the AMAS will simply record this re currency as a service to its members. However, everyone would be encouraged to do their MPR (Model Pilot Rating) assessment yearly.

It is proposed that the new rating will be called a Model Pilot Rating(MPR) and it differs significantly from existing wings in that it is dated and is a live document, meaning continually updatable.

The task would consist of three consecutive take offs, single circuits and landings coming to a complete stop in a controlled manner on the strip with any type of aircraft. Some risk assessment skills will also be required. It would be assessed under the normal AMAS Flight Proficiency assessment system.

Initially, every member would receive an MPR carrying an endorsement of “untested”. Following an MPR assessment an updated re currency would be attached to the rating. The endorsement would indicate the result of the most recent flight test by the assessor such as, but not limited to, Solo fixed wing 2016 (Solo FW 16) or, Requires Assistance (RA 16) or, requires buddy box (RBB 16) or heavy model 2016 (Solo HM 16) or multi rotor 2016 (Solo MR 16) etc. A member may self-assess that they require assistance ie for the beginner."


(2) Notice of motion:

From Skyraiders. financial members of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc: 

Skyraiders  Miniature Aerosports Society wish to add/amend the  flying Assessments and training system used for the purpose of qualifying for all forms of R/C  Flight Proficiency scheme. 

Add to all the Training/Guidance/Assessment Material  currently available  on the AMAS website that all new technologies incorporating, for example 3 axis flight stabilisation  available now or in the future be permitted to be used to assist the pilot in command of various types of models.

Eg but not limited to  Roll, Pitch, Yaw control

 Rationale behind this motion, is use of this technology may allow  novice or cognition challenged  pilots to gain confidence more quickly, intermediate flyers  have an alternate avenue to advance quicker,  scale pilots flying more unstable variants may have less problems and older pilots with failing eyesight or other disabilities of older age may  be assisted through safer model aircraft operation therefore mitigating risk.

Pilots with Physical Disabilities  may also then enjoy our wonderful hobby using modern technology

We already have electronic programmable onboard systems on F/F models to control features such as Delayed Propeller Start, Auto Rudder, Variable Incidence Tail , Variable Incidence Wing, Wing Waggler, Remote Dethermaliser, Electronic Trackers and more recently Radio Assist and GPS finders.

 Many C/L models now have Programmable ESC controlling motor speed and power outputs at different aspects of flight, as well as R/C throttle control and  multiple servos operating the many similar functions as Scale aircraft use eg, smoke, flaps, undercarriage retacts to name just a few. 

We have gyros etc on helicopters to assist maintain stability of the craft. Multirotors are fitted with flight controllers

 The modern transmitter has many programmable features to assist the pilot with easier and safer

manoeuvres and operations

Furthermore an ever increasing number of RTF, ARF, Bind and Fly, PNP models are  already available for purchase with these features as standard. 

We now present this as a formal motion for voting by the AGM/General Meeting

 

(3) Notice of Nomination for Life member:

From  Michael Snabaitis. 

For the consideration of the AMAS Inc membership:

I, Michael Snabaitis, a financial member of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc hereby nominate:

Mr John Taylor for Life membership to the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc.

As a founding member of AMAS who has a significant record of attending various events and competing in Australia and overseas. Also within the activities of the association of which could not be more longstanding. Much, if not all, of the AMAS history and culture is embodied in John  and the contributions outlined below.

For his significant contribution to the sport of Aeromodelling. 

Sustained and unmatched contribution to the AMAS Inc on multiple platforms over a sustained period of time.

John’s leadership of the AMAS evident at committee and a more personal level.

John’s key contribution here was his commitment to nurturing new Aeromodellers and the way he institutionalised this commitment through AMAS  processes. 

John  has an almost unique ability to move easily amongst the various facets of Aeromodelling and share a commitment to Aeromodelling and Aeromodelling learning regardless of the technologies and sometimes complicated understandings  that are inherent in this day and age.

All of the attributes and examples  outlined above are evidence of John’s service to the AMAS and previous  over a period of time that extends well beyond his formal service as President. He has always been strongly committed to fostering collective expertise by working closely with individuals in ways that increase their influence and personal capacity. Through this service, he has added substantial value to individuals as well as AMAS  as an organisation.


(4) Notice of Motion 

From the AMAS Inc Committee.
That the current Incorporated Club Membership yearly fee of ten dollars be increased to twenty five dollars to align with insurance premium increases over the last four years.
If accepted, this revised club membership fee would  commence 1st July 2017.

AMAS AGM/GM Notice of Motion (4)

Receipt of 'Notice of Motion (4).

From the AMAS Inc Committee.
That the current Incorporated Club Membership yearly fee of ten dollars be increased to twenty five dollars to align with insurance premium increases over the last four years.
If accepted, this revised club membership fee would  commence 1st July 2017.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - July 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety Mark Skidmore

The special CASA taskforce I created to find solutions to issues arising from the new flight crew licensing suite of regulations is continuing its work. A range of issues still need to be resolved relating to flight reviews, mustering, the multi-engine helicopter class, flight instructor training endorsements, flight tests, aerial agriculture, azimuth guidance and the air transport pilot licence flight test. Revisions to the manual of standards for Part 61 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations are also being finalised. In addition, there will be extra guidance material developed to help everyone understand and comply with the new flight crew licensing regulations. This is important work and I want to make sure the right level of resources within CASA remains committed to these initiatives until they are successfully completed. I am very pleased that feedback from the industry advisory panel has been positive and they have acknowledged the work that has been done to address the issues identified as causing difficulty to the aviation community.

The taskforce was formed in November 2015 to look at issues associated with Parts 61, 64, 141 and 142 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. These Parts form the flight crew licensing regulatory suite. It was directed to ensure that known or likely safety risks continue to be effectively addressed, while unnecessary costs are not imposed on the aviation community and requirements do not unnecessarily hinder aviation participation or the potential for growth. The industry advisory panel - comprising representatives from a range of aviation sectors - was formed to test CASA’s proposed solutions and provide input on proposals. The taskforce was originally established with a nominal completion date of 30 June 2016, subject to the full delivery of solutions to critical issues. A wide range of changes have already been made to flight crew licensing requirements, new guidance material has been produced and a sample operations manual has been issued for flying training organisations operating under Part 141.

Please find out more about the flight crew licensing taskforce.

Safe flying
Mark Skidmore


Maintenance licensing review

A comprehensive review of the regulations covering aircraft maintenance engineer licences and ratings is underway. Part 66 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations contains the rules relating to aircraft engineer licensing. A priority of the review is to address issues identified with previous proposals for a new small aircraft maintenance licensing structure. In particular, the aim is to better integrate small aircraft maintenance licences into a progressive licensing system. The review will also focus on addressing complexity in the current regulations, the knowledge and competency standards specified in the Part 66 manual of standards, the structure of licensing outcomes and training under the Australian Qualifications Framework and the statement of privileges on a licence. Part of the review will be to identify and address any errors, omissions, gaps, unintended consequences or implementation issues associated with the Part 66 regulations. The review is being carried out in collaboration with the aviation industry, with a licensing working group to be formed by CASA. The introduction of the proposed new small aircraft maintenance licensing structure, which was to have started on 4 July 2016, has been postponed while the review is underway. This follows requests from maintenance training organisations and aviation representative groups. While the review is underway people can still gain an aircraft engineer licence for the maintenance of small aircraft using the CASA basics examinations and schedule of experience system.

Find out more about the maintenance licensing review.

New fatigue rules improved

Changes to improve the fatigue management rules have been finalised. This follows feedback to CASA from the aviation community on the implications and effects of the new rules. As a result of the feedback CASA now better understands current aviation industry fatigue risk management practices. This understanding has resulted in the limitations and requirements in the new fatigue management rules contained in Civil Aviation Order 48.1 being reviewed and then revised. New sets of fatigue limitations tailored to specific sectors of the aviation industry have been developed and some provisions that were difficult to interpret or implement have been clarified. Key changes include the introduction of new appendixes for ballooning, medical transport or emergency service operations and daylight aerial work operations such as helicopter mustering. A change has also been made to allow recognition of prior fatigue training and Appendix 1 has been updated to enable operators to access a larger part of the day to conduct any operation. At this stage no further changes to the fatigue rules are planned until a formal post-implementation review is conducted. To transition to the new fatigue rules air operators must submit draft operations manual amendments or a fatigue risk management application to CASA by 31 October 2016. Operators must complete their transition to the new rules by 1 May 2017.

Find out more about the fatigue rule changes.

Relief from Jabiru limits

Operators of aircraft powered by Jabiru engines can now get relief from current operating limitations. A new direction issued by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority sets out the actions operators need to take to be able to lift the operational limitations on their Jabiru-powered aircraft. The actions include adopting the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule, inspecting certain engine components and replacing engine through bolts in accordance with the relevant Jabiru service bulletin. The timing of through bolt replacement depends on whether the aircraft has been used in flying training or similar activities. Precautionary operating limitations on Jabiru-powered aircraft were imposed by CASA in response to a high number of engine failures and power loss events for which a clear cause could not be identified. Operators must continue to observe the limitations if they do not take the actions set out in the CASA direction. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore, said the risk mitigations in the new direction had been developed in collaboration with Jabiru and with the assistance of Recreational Aviation Australia. “CASA’s engineers have looked very carefully at engine failure data and analyses and worked with Jabiru’s engineering adviser,” Mr Skidmore said. “CASA and Jabiru now have a better understanding of the problems involved and this has led to the development of the new direction. “I am pleased operators of Jabiru-powered aircraft can now resume normal operations once the appropriate maintenance-related actions have been taken.” In the meantime, CASA expects the manufacturer will continue its efforts to identify and address any underlying systemic problems.” The direction took effect on 1 July 2016.

Go to the Jabiru direction.

Vortex generators can cause risks

Potential risks associated with the installation of vortex generators on wings or other aerodynamic surfaces have been highlighted in a new airworthiness bulletin. Aircraft loss of control can result from problems caused by vortex generators or other aerodynamic enhancements. Several airflow enhancing kits in the form of vortex generator arrays are available for installation on the wings and other flying surfaces of light single and twin engine aeroplanes. A vortex generator installation typically offers the advantages of reduced stall speeds, reduced minimum single engine control speed, improved take-off and landing performance and increased maximum take-off weight. However, safety can be at risk from subtle wing surface defects upstream of the vortex generator array, as well as interaction between unapproved configurations or combinations of aerodynamic performance enhancements. This can include boundary layer control devices such as leading edge stall strips. Eight recommendations are made in relation to wing asymmetries or other aerodynamic configuration problems which may only become evident during flight at slow speeds and higher angles of attack. CASA asks that all defects related to vortex generators or aircraft configuration anomalies be reported using the defect reporting system.

Read the vortex generator airworthiness bulletin.

All you need to know about aircraft parts

Detailed guidance material on the correct identification and management of aircraft and aeronautical parts is now available. An advisory circular looks at the issues relating to approved designs, approved and unapproved parts, unserviceable and unsalvageable parts, part records, acceptance procedures and disposal of parts. Aircraft parts are identified by three different product classes, with the documentation required to accompany a part dependent on the class. A diagram sets out the life cycle of both repaired and new aircraft components, from manufacture or repair to service or disposal. Maintainers and operators are advised to have procedures to prevent the procurement of unapproved parts, which should be established prior to purchasing parts and materials for installation in type-certificated products. Clear records or accuracy of electronic data storage is important for showing compliance with airworthiness directives and other mandatory requirements. Salvaged aircraft parts can lack a maintenance history and may not be able to be traced, with many released to service after having been recovered from aircraft involved in accidents or incidents. To maintain aircraft components that are salvaged, approved maintenance organisations should establish clear procedures that detail applicable additional precautionary steps.

Read the parts advisory circular.

Advice on maintaining amateur built aircraft

Advice on the regulations and requirements for the maintenance of amateur built aircraft has been updated. A Civil Aviation Advisory Publication covers maintenance for both amateur built experimental aircraft and amateur built aircraft acceptance. The advisory provides information on scheduled inspections, rectification and modification, maintenance certification and the issue of maintenance releases. It sets out who is permitted to perform maintenance on amateur built aircraft, who may issue a maintenance release, owner-builder maintenance responsibilities, replacement parts and maintenance schedules and records. An amateur builder must fabricate and/or assemble the major portion of their aircraft to qualify for a maintenance authorisation. This is to establish a builder has constructed the aircraft to a sufficient extent that they understand the construction of the aircraft and any special construction processes. They will also have assembled and installed the various aircraft systems to a sufficient extent to have a sound understanding of the systems and to be able to ensure the systems will continue to meet required performance standards. By building more than half of the aircraft they will be expected to have sufficient relevant hand skills to be able to safely maintain the aircraft to at least the same standard to which it was constructed.

Find out more about maintaining amateur built aircraft.

Seminars for pilots and engineers continue

There will be 12 safety seminars for pilots around the nation during August 2016. Lessons for life seminars are scheduled for Rockhampton, Townsville, Katherine, Victoria River Downs, Yarrawonga, Aldinga, Bendigo, Albury, Moorabbin, Orange, Tamworth and Taree. These seminars will focus on key safety issues that continue to feature in accidents such as flight in low visibility, unplanned or unapproved low flying, pilot incapacitation and weather. Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as top safety concerns. There will be a discussion about at least one case study from accident reports. Other issues may be discussed such as regulatory changes, pilot responsibilities in relation to maintenance releases and correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes. The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

There will be two engineering knowledge development seminars at Darwin Engineering on Thursday 4 August and Essendon - MTCE on Tuesday 30 August. These seminars will focus on professional development, continuing airworthiness, certification, maintenance licencing and ageing aircraft. They are ideal learning opportunities for everyone involved in aviation maintenance, with lots of opportunities to ask questions and provide feedback to CASA.

Notice of Annual and General Meeting.

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY Inc

NOTICE OF ANNUAL AND  GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modelling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Google Hangout (or video conference TBA)

11:00 AM (Qld Time) Saturday 3rd September, 2016

at the Loganholme Aeromodellers Radio Control Society.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for.

NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 20th August, 2016.

 

Nominations (refer Constitution Clause 19) must be seconded by another member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members. Nomination forms are available via the website.

 

Positions: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer,  Committee member

Note: The current Treasurer will be retiring and not re standing.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now.  Refer Annex A  for currently received notice of motions / Nomination

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 3rd August  2016.

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 4th August  2016 for initial consideration .

Any submissions from members requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in the  revised form with any other Notices of Motion on  the 17th August.

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 17th August  to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 2nd September.
Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary on behalf of the AMAS inc Committee.

0417879416

 

 

ANNEX A.

 

(1) Notice of motion:

From Mr Richard Brown a financial member of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc :

 

The motion is to introduce a non-mandatory Flight Proficiency re currency in complementing the existing Solo and Advanced ratings. The purpose of this re currency is to amend the wings system to reflect a member’s current flying proficiency.

It will not change the existing Solo or Advanced wings rating but it will give the individual a way to test, track and record their current flight proficiency and it demonstrates that they take their own and other people’s safety seriously. It also provides a simple method when visiting other clubs to show your current flying proficiency.

This simple task will not be compulsory and the AMAS will simply record this re currency as a service to its members. However, everyone would be encouraged to do their MPR (Model Pilot Rating) assessment yearly.

It is proposed that the new rating will be called a Model Pilot Rating(MPR) and it differs significantly from existing wings in that it is dated and is a live document, meaning continually updatable.

The task would consist of three consecutive take offs, single circuits and landings coming to a complete stop in a controlled manner on the strip with any type of aircraft. Some risk assessment skills will also be required. It would be assessed under the normal AMAS Flight Proficiency assessment system.

Initially, every member would receive an MPR carrying an endorsement of “untested”. Following an MPR assessment an updated re currency would be attached to the rating. The endorsement would indicate the result of the most recent flight test by the assessor such as, but not limited to, Solo fixed wing 2016 (Solo FW 16) or, Requires Assistance (RA 16) or, requires buddy box (RBB 16) or heavy model 2016 (Solo HM 16) or multi rotor 2016 (Solo MR 16) etc. A member may self-assess that they require assistance ie for the beginner."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2) Notice of motion:

From Skyraiders. financial members of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc:

 

Skyraiders  Miniature Aerosports Society wish to add/amend the  flying Assessments and training system used for the purpose of qualifying for all forms of R/C  Flight Proficiency scheme. 

 

Add to all the Training/Guidance/Assessment Material  currently available  on the AMAS website that all new technologies incorporating, for example 3 axis flight stabilisation  available now or in the future be permitted to be used to assist the pilot in command of various types of models.

Eg but not limited to  Roll, Pitch, Yaw control

 

 Rationale behind this motion, is use of this technology may allow  novice or cognition challenged  pilots to gain confidence more quickly, intermediate flyers  have an alternate avenue to advance quicker,  scale pilots flying more unstable variants may have less problems and older pilots with failing eyesight or other disabilities of older age may  be assisted through safer model aircraft operation therefore mitigating risk.

 

Pilots with Physical Disabilities  may also then enjoy our wonderful hobby using modern technology

 

We already have electronic programmable onboard systems on F/F models to control features such as Delayed Propeller Start, Auto Rudder, Variable Incidence Tail , Variable Incidence Wing, Wing Waggler, Remote Dethermaliser, Electronic Trackers and more recently Radio Assist and GPS finders.

 

 Many C/L models now have Programmable ESC controlling motor speed and power outputs at different aspects of flight, as well as R/C throttle control and  multiple servos operating the many similar functions as Scale aircraft use eg, smoke, flaps, undercarriage retacts to name just a few.

 

We have gyros etc on helicopters to assist maintain stability of the craft. Multirotors are fitted with flight controllers

 

 The modern transmitter has many programmable features to assist the pilot with easier and safer

manoeuvres and operations

 

Furthermore an ever increasing number of RTF, ARF, Bind and Fly, PNP models are  already available for purchase with these features as standard.

 

We now present this as a formal motion for voting by the AGM/General Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3) Notice of Nomination for Life member:

From  Michael Snabaitis.

 

For the consideration of the AMAS Inc membership:

 

I, Michael Snabaitis, a financial member of the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc hereby nominate:

 

Mr John Taylor for Life membership to the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society Inc.

 

As a founding member of AMAS who has a significant record of attending various events and competing in Australia and overseas. Also within the activities of the association of which could not be more longstanding. Much, if not all, of the AMAS history and culture is embodied in John  and the contributions outlined below.

 

 For his significant contribution to the sport of Aeromodelling.

 

Sustained and unmatched contribution to the AMAS Inc on multiple platforms over a sustained period of time.

 

John’s leadership of the AMAS evident at committee and a more personal level.

 

John’s key contribution here was his commitment to nurturing new Aeromodellers and the way he institutionalised this commitment through AMAS  processes.

 

John  has an almost unique ability to move easily amongst the various facets of Aeromodelling and share a commitment to Aeromodelling and Aeromodelling learning regardless of the technologies and sometimes complicated understandings  that are inherent in this day and age.

 

All of the attributes and examples  outlined above are evidence of John’s service to the AMAS and previous  over a period of time that extends well beyond his formal service as President. He has always been strongly committed to fostering collective expertise by working closely with individuals in ways that increase their influence and personal capacity. Through this service, he has added substantial value to individuals as well as AMAS  as an organisation.

 

 

 

UAS airworthiness framework discussion paper.

CASA Briefing Newsletter - June 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

June 2016

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore

A detailed timetable for the completion of the aviation regulatory reform program has been released.  The timetable covers 20 regulatory change projects to be completed over the next three years.  These include the general operating rules, air transport operations, aerial work, continuing airworthiness and maintenance for small aircraft, small aircraft maintenance licensing, sport and recreational operations and unmanned aircraft.  The timetable also covers new regulations already introduced and still in transition, such as flight crew licensing.  This new regulatory reform timetable has been developed after extensive consultation with aviation representative groups and individuals from all sectors of the aviation community.  It will be adjusted and updated if circumstances change to ensure no unnecessary burdens are imposed on the aviation community.

We have carefully developed the new timetable to take into account the aviation community’s capacity to implement and adjust to regulatory changes.  Our main aim is to avoid placing any unnecessary burdens on aviation organisations or individuals during the process of developing and implementing new and improved regulations.  Plenty of time has been allowed for consultation on the development of new regulations so we can listen to feedback and respond to the views of the aviation community.  The timetable has realistic transition periods to give everyone adequate time to move across to the new regulations.  Importantly, we have taken into account CASA’s ability to provide information, support and guidance on the introduction of new regulations.  I can assure everyone CASA has learnt from past mistakes made during the development and introduction of regulatory changes such as the flight crew licensing suite.  Consultation processes are being improved, regulations will be tested with the aviation community before introduction and information will be presented clearly and provided consistently.  Our new approach to regulatory reform is consistent with the Federal Government’s response to the Aviation Safety Regulation Review, which stated time was needed for the aviation community and CASA to adjust to and successfully implement regulatory changes.

Go to the regulatory change timetable.

Safe flying
Mark Skidmore


Cessna 100 series SIDs extension

Cessna 100 series aircraft owners have an extra two years to complete the special structural inspection program developed by Cessna.  The extension applies to the Supplemental Inspection Document – or SIDs - requirements for Cessna 100 series aircraft used in private operations.  The SIDs inspection program of these aircraft must now be completed by 30 June 2018.  The extension is subject to a number of conditions designed to ensure continuing safety of flight and progressive compliance with the SIDs requirements.  The extension was provided after consultation with the aviation community, including the chief engineers of a number of maintenance organisations.  CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore, said the extension will make it easier for aircraft owners and maintainers to plan and complete the important structural inspections.  Mr Skidmore said: “We have listened to feedback from both owners and maintainers about the need for extra time to complete SIDs on Cessna 100 series aircraft in private operations.  Both owners and maintainers said the original deadline of 30 June 2016 was causing problems such as a backlog of work and ordering replacement components.  The extra two years for SIDs completion will allow Cessna 100 series aircraft owners and maintainers to plan to spread out the work and the costs over a longer period with no unacceptable risks to safety.  This initiative by CASA is an example of our commitment to work with the aviation community to get outcomes that balance safety and operational requirements.”

Read the Cessna 100 series instrument.

Pictures are available of corrosion and defects already found on Cessna 100 series aircraft.

Look early and closely at control cables

The importance of taking a closer look at aircraft control cables has been highlighted by corrosion found on a rudder cable terminal.  The corrosion was present under a rubber tubing sleeve installed by the manufacturer, with eleven instances of control cable terminal corrosion discovered on the one aircraft.  These cables had been in service for less than ten years.  Corrosion can be found on control cable terminal fittings manufactured from stainless steel SAE-AISI 303Se or SAE-AISI 304.  In an airworthiness bulletin CASA says reports of flight control cable terminal fitting separation failures continue to be received in Australia, New Zealand and in the United States.  Failure of a flight control cable terminal can result in loss of control of an aircraft.  The airworthiness bulletin urges operators and maintainers to consider replacing all flight control cable assemblies with terminal fittings manufactured from stainless steel SAE-AISI 303Se or SAE-AISI 304 before reaching 15 years total time in service.  In addition, consideration should be given to inspecting control cable terminals underneath any rubber sleeves or tape for corrosion pitting or rust, irrespective of total time in service.  Any control cable and terminal assemblies with signs of corrosion pitting or cracked terminals should be replaced before further flight.

Read the control cable airworthiness bulletin.

CASA apologises for medical certificate delays

CASA is apologising to pilots and air traffic controllers who may be experiencing delays in obtaining an aviation medical certificate.  The majority of aviation medical certificate applications are still being processed within the 28 day service delivery target set by CASA.  However, there are a number of applications taking longer.  CASA sincerely apologises to pilots who have been waiting longer than normal for their medical to be finalised and thanks everyone for their patience.  Anyone who considers they are facing hardship due to a delay in medical processing should contact CASA as soon as possible.  CASA is working hard to address the delays as quickly as possible and has allocated more staff to medical certificate processing.  Changes are also being made to workflow practices to improve the processing times.  CASA prioritises medical certificate applications where the current certificate is due to expire within 14 days.  Since the start of the updated online aviation medical system on 21 March 2016 CASA has issued more than 5000 medical certificates to pilots and air traffic controllers.  A class 1 medical certificate is currently being processed by CASA within an average of 19.9 days.

Pilots have the option of seeking a revalidation of their current medical certificate from their DAME for up to two months.  DAMEs can do this if the pilot appears to meet the required medical standard and provided the medical certificate has not been endorsed 'renew by CASA only'.  This arrangement provides an additional 40 working days for assessment and provision of further information when required.  Pilots are encouraged to ask their DAME at the time of their examination if they qualify for a revalidation.

Find more information on aviation medicals.

Flight review and proficiency check changes from 1 July

Solutions are continuing to be found to issues arising from the implementation of the new flight crew licensing regulations.  This is the result of the work of the special CASA Part 61 Taskforce as well as careful consideration of feedback provided by the aviation community.  The latest solutions relate to the rules covering aircraft rating flight reviews and instrument proficiency checks, which will take effect from 1 July 2016.  The new requirements introduced under Part 61 were consistent with the approach taken by other international aviation authorities.  However, CASA has listened to feedback from the aviation community which indicated the new requirements would impose significant costs for some pilots.  The latest changes - in the form of exemptions - will reduce and simplify the requirements for pilots to undertake annual and biennial checks, while ensuring safety is maintained.  CASA is currently preparing comprehensive information to explain the changes, including guidance for pilots on which aircraft they should undertake their instrument proficiency checks in so they get the most benefit from the exemption.  Flight reviews for the low-level, private instrument flight rules and night visual flight rules operational ratings remain unchanged.

Get the latest on the improvements to the licensing regulations.

Get your email address right for ARNs

People applying to CASA for an Aviation Reference Number – commonly known as an ARN – are being asked to make sure they use their own secure email address in their application.  This is important because CASA will use the email address submitted in the application for sending correspondence and personal information, such information on aviation medicals, to individuals.  Correspondence from CASA may be lost if the right individual email address is not included in the application.  Using a valid individual email address is also essential to protect the privacy of people with an Aviation Reference Number.  Using a company or group email address means other people may see future emails from CASA.  Student pilots should not use the general email address of their flying school as this is not an individual email address.  CASA will only accept Aviation Reference Number applications that include an individual email address.  Remember if you already have an Aviation Reference Number and wish to change your email address this can be done at any time by using the CASA Self-Service online tool.

More information on Aviation Reference Numbers.

Go to CASA Self-Service.

Learn now about wildlife hazards

A collision between an aircraft and wildlife is expensive and can be dangerous.  A new CASA video explores the issues relating to bird and animal strikes and explains the work being done to minimise the risks.  In Australia bird strikes that result in an aircraft being grounded cost about $45,000 per incident.  Brian Greeves of Aviation Solutions says pilots need to learn more about wildlife to avoid the risks and must report all strikes so data can be collected and analysed.  Phil Shaw of Avisure says knowledge about the species of birds being struck by aircraft is really important to help manage the problem.  He says trends can be established and risks identified for particular species.  Pilots also need to understand the behaviour of birds, such as whether they take off into the wind or down wind.  If pilots see birds while flying they should use the radio to let other pilots in the area know of the potential risk.  The video is part of a Flight Safety Australia feature on wildlife management.

Watch the wildlife strike video now.

Read the wildlife management feature.

Comment now on frequency change options

CASA is seeking feedback from the aviation community on options to maintain safety at the Dubbo/Narromine and Benalla/Wangaratta aerodromes.  While undertaking reviews of new instrument approach procedure designs for Narromine and Wangaratta a number of potential safety risks have been identified.  These included aircraft operating in close proximity to each other on different frequencies and aerodromes in close proximity sharing the same common traffic advisory frequencies and runway designators.  Pilot situational awareness may be reduced if the current arrangements continue when the new approach procedures are introduced.  CASA has suggested a number of options such as combining the respective pairs of aerodromes onto one common traffic advisory frequency and changing runway designators at Narromine.  Comment on these options is being sought and until final determinations are made CASA has restricted the publication of the new procedures.

Get the details on the change review and comment before 10 July 2016

 

Extra time for approved testing officers

Approved testing officers – flight instructors who hold delegations from CASA to carry out certain flight tests – now have an extra 12 months before they need to move across to new regulatory requirements.  On 30 June 2016 approved testing officer delegations were to have expired as a result of changes introduced in the licensing suite of regulations.  Under these new regulations former approved testing officers would conduct flight tests under the authority of a flight examiner rating, but no longer as CASA delegates.  CASA has listened to feedback from approved testing officers about insurance coverage and related issues and granted an extension of existing delegations until 30 June 2017.  This means the indemnity protection offered to all CASA delegates and authorised persons, as set out in Civil Aviation Advisory Publication (CAAP) Admin-1, will continue to apply until that date.  Approved testing officers who still have their delegation and have not obtained a flight examiner rating do not need to take any action at this time.  Their current arrangements will continue for 12 months.  CASA will be proposing a legislative amendment to enable former approved testing officers who have already transitioned to the flight examiner rating to regain their status as approved testing officers until 30 June 2017.  This status will include the indemnity protection that delegation provides.  Until that change can be made flight examiner rating holders are not covered by the CAAP Admin-1 indemnity.

Get more details about the approved testing officer changes.

Unmanned aircraft airworthiness proposals open for comment

A detailed set of proposals for the safety regulation of the airworthiness of unmanned aircraft systems has been released for comment.  The proposed approach to unmanned aircraft airworthiness has been designed to be cost effective and risk based.  It would allow regulations to be scaled to the size and operational capabilities of unmanned aircraft.  This would create an airworthiness system capable of covering unmanned devices from those that can fit in a hand, to large scale fully certified systems.  The proposed framework would be outcome based, which means approved equipment or systems could be used or operators could show compliance through innovative and novel designs.  In a discussion paper CASA says the proposed approach would be in line with the unmanned aircraft airworthiness frameworks being developed in the United States and Europe.  There are three unmanned aircraft system categories proposed for Australia – open, specific and certified.  The open category would cover very small and small unmanned aircraft with a low level of operational risk.  The certified category would cover high risk operations such as flying a large unmanned aircraft over a populated area.  The specific category would include unmanned aircraft in operations that fall between the risk levels posed by the open and certified categories.  This approach means the regulatory requirements increase appropriately as the level of risk of the unmanned aircraft and its operations increases.

Comment on the unmanned aircraft airworthiness discussion paper before 10 August 2016.

Get to a safety seminar

There will be four safety seminars for pilots around the nation during July 2016.  Lessons for life seminars are scheduled for Lismore, Ballina, Launceston and Burnie.  These seminars will focus on key safety issues that continue to feature in accidents such as flight in low visibility, unplanned or unapproved low flying, pilot incapacitation and weather.  Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as top safety concerns.  There will be a discussion about at least one case study from accident reports.  Other issues may be discussed such as regulatory changes, pilot responsibilities in relation to maintenance releases and correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes.  The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Find an AvSafety seminar near you


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.

NATIONAL MODEL AVIATION WEEK!

NATIONAL- 1

Consultation on DP 1529US - UAS airworthiness framework [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

DP 1529US

CASA wishes to advise that DP 1529US - UAS airworthiness framework has been published for public consultation.

CASA is updating the regulations to provide a comprehensive regulatory framework for UAS airworthiness to support safe and reliable operations into the future.

UAS are currently covered by Part 101 of CASR, which was promulgated in 2002 in anticipation of civil operations of UAS. At the time, there was little civil operational experience to draw on from other States and consequently the regulations relied heavily on the rules governing model aircraft and conventionally piloted aircraft (CPA).

In relation to airworthiness for smaller UAS, the current regulations generally provide insufficient detail, and for large UAS they apply the general airworthiness regulations, which are often unsuitable for UAS.

The international aviation community and National Aviation Authorities (NAAs) have made significant progress since 2002. The major aviation nations have been collaborating to develop an internationally harmonised regulatory framework for airworthiness of UAS.

This document sets out the high-level details of the airworthiness regulatory framework that CASA proposes to integrate into the regulations. It is closely harmonised with recent proposals by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and provides a comprehensive airworthiness system that would support the ongoing growth of the UAS industry into the future.

This Discussion Paper (DP) will be of interest to:

  • holders of Unmanned Operator's Certificates
  • unmanned aircraft system (UAS) owners and operators
  • UAS designers and manufacturers
  • UAS maintainers.

Comments close 10 August 2016.

View this DP on the CASA website at www.casa.gov.au/consultationopen


Next General Meeting Notice of Motion.

Proposed motion to be presented at the next AMAS meeting.
The motion is to introduce a non-mandatory Flight Proficiency re currency in complementing the existing Solo and Advanced ratings. The purpose of this re currency is to amend the wings system to reflect a member’s current flying proficiency.
It will not change the existing Solo or Advanced wings rating but it will give the individual a way to test, track and record their current flight proficiency and it demonstrates that they take their own and other people’s safety seriously. It also provides a simple method when visiting other clubs to show your current flying proficiency.
This simple task will not be compulsory and the AMAS will simply record this re currency as a service to its members. However, everyone would be encouraged to do their MPR (Model Pilot Rating) assessment yearly.
It is proposed that the new rating will be called a Model Pilot Rating(MPR) and it differs significantly from existing wings in that it is dated and is a live document, meaning continually updatable.
The task would consist of three consecutive take offs, single circuits and landings coming to a complete stop in a controlled manner on the strip with any type of aircraft. Some risk assessment skills will also be required. It would be assessed under the normal AMAS Flight Proficiency assessment system.
Initially, every member would receive an MPR carrying an endorsement of “untested”. Following an MPR assessment an updated re currency would be attached to the rating. The endorsement would indicate the result of the most recent flight test by the assessor such as, but not limited to, Solo fixed wing 2016 (Solo FW 16) or, Requires Assistance (RA 16) or, requires buddy box (RBB 16) or heavy model 2016 (Solo HM 16) or multi rotor 2016 (Solo MR 16) etc. A member may self-assess that they require assistance ie for the beginner.

CASA Briefing May 2016

CASA Briefing

May 2016

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore

The reinvigoration of CASA’s leadership team has been completed and the final touches are being made to CASA’s new structure.  These changes set the platform for developing and implementing a range of reforms to CASA that will fundamentally alter the way the organisation delivers its safety regulation responsibilities.  Our new structure has been carefully developed to better align CASA’s activities with our responsibilities to the aviation community.  Importantly, it will build stronger and more effective internal relationships, helping to break down any ‘silos’.  This is most clear from the creation of the new Aviation Group, headed by Graeme Crawford, who has 37 years of experience working in the aviation industry.  The Aviation group has six branches covering all of CASA’s day-to-day aviation activities.  This includes airspace and aerodromes, operations, flight standards and airworthiness.  Previously these functions sat in separate divisions, with executive managers reporting to me.  Now all these aviation related functions report to one group manager who is responsible for ensuring his team are working effectively together to get the right outcomes.  The management layer below the group manager will be expected to collaborate and work in a team environment at all times.

The new structure supports my commitment to communication and consultation with the aviation community through the work to be overseen by the Stakeholder Engagement Group, headed by Rob Walker.  Rob, who has a strong background in aviation and communication, will bring a new focus to listening to the views of people across the aviation community.  He will ensure consultation is effective and communication is targeted so everyone gets the information they need in a timely manner.  We have also created a new Sustainability Group, headed by Tracey Frey, who has broad experience in change management and business process improvement.  This group encompasses all essential support functions, such as human resources, as well as service delivery.  There will be a lot of work done in the service delivery area to improve CASA’s ability to provide better support for the aviation community and to address identified shortcomings.  Resources will be reorganised to create a more effective service centre so the delivery of regulatory services meets the reasonable expectations of the aviation community.

There are two other renewed work areas in CASA’s new structure which are central to the organisation’s efficient and effective operations.  These are the Legal Affairs, Regulatory Policy and International Strategy Branch and the Finance Branch.  The Legal Affairs, Regulatory Policy and International Strategy Branch, headed by Jonathan Aleck, will work to ensure the principles underpinning CASA’s regulatory philosophy are fully integrated into our regulatory policies and practices, as well as providing legal services.  It will also reformulate CASA’s approach to international engagement.  The Finance Branch, headed by Simon Frawley, is tasked with managing CASA’s commitment to fiscal efficiency and discipline.

Safe flying
Mark Skidmore


Learn about your circuit breakers

Detailed advice on a range of safety issues related to circuit breakers is now available.  An airworthiness bulletin issued by CASA makes recommendations for the maintenance, installation and operation of circuit breakers.  Faulty circuit breakers are one of the main sources of electrical arcing, with the likelihood of arcing increasing as aircraft age.  The most common circuit breakers in aircraft are thermally activated using a bimetal strip.  Caution needs to be exercised when re-setting tripped circuit breakers as service difficulty reports show re-setting can lead to smoke, burned wires, electrical odours, arcing, and loss of aircraft systems.  This is because the fault that caused the breaker to trip still exists.  CASA recommends pilots do not re-set a tripped circuit breaker in-flight unless this is allowed in the approved operating manual or a catastrophic event could occur if it is not re-set.  It is strongly recommended that circuit breakers are cycled under no load during an aircraft’s scheduled maintenance to remove any possible internal surface corrosion.  If there are no hard replacement times set by the original equipment manufacturer, circuit breakers should be replaced at appropriate intervals.  The Federal Aviation Administration recommends replacement every 2000 hours.

Read the circuit breaker airworthiness bulletin

How to avoid watery fuel

A comprehensive set of recommendations has been issued on how to avoid aircraft fuel system water contamination.  Water in fuel results in loss of engine power, rough running and engine failure.  There are a range of fuel/water problems including water entering the fuel tank through a faulty cap, water contaminated fuel being pumped into an aircraft, unintended water retaining ridges in the bottom of fuel tanks and flawed water drain location.  Poorly executed post-refuelling and pre-flight water checks also lead to risks.  In an updated airworthiness bulletin CASA sets out the issues relating to fuel/water problems in detail, going through each of the causes of contamination.  During pre-flight inspections and after every re-fuel cap locks and latches should be checked for correct operation and to make sure the cap is tight and secure when closed/locked.  When fuelling from drums check expiry dates and use a filter.  When refuelling from jerry cans use an electrically conducting funnel equipped with a serviceable micro filter.  Drain samples of fuel from the tanks in accordance with the approved data and be familiar with all drain locations on a specific model of aircraft.  There is no single point of drainage that can be used to check for all fuel system contaminants simultaneously, so always take the time to properly check all drain locations.

Get all the details on avoiding water contamination of fuel

Reminders for medical certificate applications

Pilots and air traffic controllers are being reminded about the new procedures for paying the medical certificate application fee.  CASA cannot process medical certificate applications until the processing fee is paid into the medical records system, MRS.  People applying for Class 1 and Class 3 medical certificates must pay the processing fee into the medical records system before they see their Designated Aviation Medical Examiner or DAME.  Class 2 applicants don’t have to pay the processing fee until they see their DAME.  This is because payment of the fee is not required in some cases – some DAMEs can assess and issue Class 2 medical certificates.  If a Class 2 medical certificate application does need to be assessed by CASA, the fee needs to be paid into the medical records system at the end of the examination.  Otherwise the DAME will not be able to submit the application to CASA for processing.  The medical certificate application fee can no longer be paid using the CASA online payment portal.

All pilots who wear contact lenses or glasses when they fly are being reminded they are required to have a spare pair of glasses with them in the cockpit.  They also need to have their spare pair of glasses checked when it’s time to have their medical certificate renewed.  So it’s important to remember to take your spare pair of glasses with you when you see your DAME.

Find out everything you need to know about medicals

New video explains satellite navigation system changes

Pilots needing a quick and easy-to-follow explanation of what is happening in the transition to the global navigation satellite system for instrument flight rules operations can now watch a new video.  The video, on CASA’s YouTube channel, has been released to coincide with the decommissioning of 179 navigational aids on 26 May 2016.  Almost 50 per cent of the old ground-based navigational aids are being removed from service as part of the switch to the global navigation satellite system.  The rest of the navigation aids will be kept to form a backup network that can be used by pilots flying by the instrument flights rules if they cannot get access to the satellite system.  The global navigation satellite system is now being used as the primary means of instrument navigation because it is more accurate, has greater integrity, reduces flight times and can be easier to use.  Pilots need to be aware there will be amendments to documents, such as the en-route supplement, and charts to reflect the full adoption of the global navigation satellite system.  This may mean some pilots will need to alter their flight planning practices.  The global navigation satellite system provides an instrument flight rules equipped aircraft with the location of where it is.  In the database of the on-board navigation system are virtual waypoints that replace the ground navigation aids.  Aircraft fly between the waypoints, freed from having to navigate between fixed points on the ground.

Watch the navigation video now

Find the list of ground navigation aids being decommissioned

Help for safe visual night flights

There’s an important new resource for everyone involved in night visual flight rules operations and training.  A detailed guide to the night visual flights rules requirements has been released, including an explanation of the relevant licensing regulations, aircraft requirements, hazards and risks, flight planning and the conduct of operations.  The complexities and risks of night visual flying means pilots must undergo specialist training, which includes obtaining a rating and aircraft endorsement.  Accidents at night are two and a half times more likely to be fatal than a day-time accident, with loss of control a factor in a significant number of accidents.  CASA strongly recommends night visual flight rules operations only take place in conditions that allow the pilot to discern a natural visual horizon, or where the external environment has sufficient cues for the pilot to continually determine the pitch and roll attitude of the aircraft.  When the visual horizon is difficult to see and/or there is a lack of external visual reference, a pilot is much more likely to lose control of the aircraft if flying by visual reference only instead of by cross-reference to instruments.  Even if visual reference is available at night, it can often be misleading and can further disorient a pilot attempting to fly visually.  Integrating visual and basic instrument flying is essential when flying at night under the visual flight rules. 

Get all the details on night visual flight rules safe operations

More guidance on the way for flying training organisations

CASA is currently working to produce a package of guidance material to help flying training organisations that need to transition to the new Part 142 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations.  Transition to Part 142, which covers structured flying training for multi-crew pilot and air transport pilot licences, is required by August 2018.  The new guidance material follows the development of similar support for flying training organisations transitioning to Part 141, which covers training for recreational, private and commercial pilot licences in single pilot aircraft.  Under the new regulations flying training organisations who want to be authorised under Part 142 need to develop and maintain a safety management system, a training management system and an exposition, as well as nominate a safety manager.  To help operators meet these requirements CASA will be publishing a series of guidance documents and tools, including a sample exposition, technical assessor’s handbook and work and information sheets. The new material is expected to be available in mid-2016.

CASA is in the process of wrapping up the suite of materials available for Part 141 operators, with sample syllabuses for helicopter private and commercial pilot licences published in May 2016.  The Part 141 guidance package includes a sample operations manual and guide, technical assessor’s handbook and worksheet, instructions for CASA staff on conducting assessments, sample flying training syllabuses and an information sheet.  The package will be complete once a sample syllabus for the aeroplane commercial pilot licence has been finalised.

Get the latest news about the new licensing regulations

See the sample syllabuses for flying training organisations

Top women pilots honoured

Three trainee professional women pilots have been recognised by CASA for their outstanding academic achievements.  CASA sponsors the Sir Donald Anderson Trophy as part of the Australian Women Pilots’ Association awards.  First place in the awards went to Hayley Umbers from NSW, who topped the class for commercial pilot licence studies with an overall average of 94.57 per cent.  This included the perfect result of 100 per cent for navigation, and with no result less than 90 per cent.  Second place went to Renee Close also from NSW who passed all seven air transport pilot licence subjects with an overall average of 83.29 per cent.  Kate Seymour from Queensland came in third place passing all seven commercial pilot licence subject-parts with an average result of 90.43 per cent.  This included a score of 100 per cent in operations, performance and flight planning.  All three recipients are students at the University of New South Wales.  The award winners also received a monetary prize from CASA.  The awards are named after Sir Donald Anderson who was Australia’s Director-General of Civil Aviation from 1956 until 1973.

A lesson can save a pilot’s life

There will be 12 safety seminars for pilots around the nation during June 2016.  Lessons for life seminars are scheduled for Dubbo, Parkes, Tamworth, Cessnock, Scone, Narrabri, Gold Coast, Redcliffe, Maitland Yorke Peninsula, Gove, Bunbury and Warracknabeal.  These seminars will focus on key safety issues that continue to feature in accidents such as flight in low visibility, unplanned or unapproved low flying, pilot incapacitation and weather.  Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as top safety concerns.  There will be a discussion about at least one case study from accident reports.  Other issues may be discussed such as regulatory changes, pilot responsibilities in relation to maintenance releases and correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes.  The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Find an AvSafety seminar near you


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.




Multiple member upload file

Can be accessed via the AMAS Inc Secretary at their convenience.

Flight Safety Australia May-June 2016

Flight Safety Australia May-June 2016 out now!

Flight Safety Australia's May-June edition is now live: download the iPad app from the App Store, or the Android app from Google Play to your tablet and enjoy the interactive magazine experience, complete with video and audio. And don’t forget that these stories will also appear over the life of the issue (May-June), on www.flightsafetyaustralia.com

Flight Safety Australia News Site, Download in the
AppStore, Download from Google Play

  

Flight Safety Australia’s May-June issue examines an underappreciated but pervasive threat facing offshore helicopter aviation: wildlife strike. The lead story reports on how the massive offshore structures being built to service the gas fields off northwest Australia have many of the characteristics of ideal seabird habitats. These structures are also landing sites for the heavy helicopters ferrying workers and supplies. It’s just one example of how wildlife strike is a multifaceted and evolving hazard. Wildlife experts tell how important it is to understand how different birds behave—when startled, for example, some species take off into the wind, others downwind. Despite this, wildlife strike receives much less detailed attention from pilots than other threats such as weather.

The issue finds aviation safety wisdom in an unusual place: professional cycling. British Olympic and professional cycling teams went from perpetual tail-enders to world-beaters after adopting a philosophy of continuous analysis and improvement. Health, diet and rider comfort came under scrutiny, making changes as minor as a new hand-washing policy, and teams providing their own bedding when riders stayed in hotels on multi-stage races. The principle of creating major improvement from a multitude of small detailed changes is a model for effective safety management.

Continuing the sporting analogy, contributor, Kreisha Ballantyne, writes on how general aviation pilots can use mental rehearsal, a widely used sporting technique, of proven effect, to improve their flying. A notable user of this technique is aerobatic pilot Matt Hall. Contributor Thomas P. Turner explores the similar theme of developing a repertoire of spring-loaded rehearsed reactions to in-flight emergencies.

The emphasis on realistic training continues in a look at disaster simulation and training that emphasises how realistic simulation produces deeper learning. Contributor, Adrian Park, dissects the errors, assumptions and culture surrounding a fatal helicopter crash at a police training exercise in Germany in 2013.

There’s also a preview of Out ’n’ Back II, CASA’s online video guide to flight planning and outback conditions. Aircraft maintenance is the theme of two stories: one looking at nose gear failures in the popular Cessna 210; and the other examining how a British Airways Boeing 747 came to have landing gear failure the morning after its hydraulic systems had been refurbished.

The popular quiz and reader-written close calls round out a packed issue.

 


An article from The Australian concerning the CASA and 'drone' operation:

OPERATIONS 'NEAR' AIRPORTS.

AMAS Inc May Newsletter

Can be found here:

Navigating the Amended CASR Part 101:

The amendment to Part 101 of Civil Aviation Safety Regulation (CASR 1998) will come into force in late September this year. There are substantial changes in the new legislation, which will have significant ramifications for existing commercial certified operators and for new entrants to the civil remotely piloted commercial aircraft industry.  The amendment and explanatory statement can be found here:

The Riverland Club Float Fly:

Riverland  Float 2016

Grafton GALAHS Flyin.

Fly  In  May 2016 4

CASA Briefing Newsletter - April 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

CASA Briefing

April 2016

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore

Change is happening at CASA.  The pace of change may not be as fast as some would prefer, but real change is underway.  Like any worthwhile task everything cannot be achieved at once and foundations must be laid before the structure can be constructed.  This month I outlined the progress CASA is making in building a new and improved organisation to meet the safety regulatory needs of the aviation community and the Australian public.  Of course, an important part of this process is delivering on the Government response to the recommendations of the Aviation Safety Regulation Review.  In my keynote address to the CHC Safety and Quality Summit I gave an assurance there will be no turning back from our commitment to CASA’s new regulatory philosophy, the application of ‘just culture’ principles, investing in a safety partnership with the aviation community, communication and meaningful consultation.

One of the keys to successful change is getting CASA’s people to understand they are one part of a much larger aviation safety system.  We do not hold all the knowledge and we need to form safety partnerships across industry, agencies, regulators and the global aviation community.  There must be an environment where we can all work together to enhance the safety of the aviation environment we enjoy today.  Our aim is to keep people flying and flying safely.

A lot of work is underway to implement a ‘just culture’ approach in CASA.  We are developing a regulatory and operational environment where genuinely honest mistakes are recognised for what they are and are used as an opportunity for further learning and improvement.  CASA’s response will be to understand why the mistakes were made and how we can reduce the likelihood the same mistakes will occur in the future.  I consider this approach as a fundamental shift from our recent past and we need to recognise a cultural change in both CASA and the aviation community is required to harvest the real benefits of this concept.  This is a challenge for us but we are working hard to meet the challenge.

Please read my speech to the CHC Summit.

Safe flying
Mark Skidmore


Radio frequency discussion paper

A discussion paper is to be released to canvass issues relating to radio frequency use by pilots operating by the visual flight rules in uncontrolled airspace.  This follows a teleconference between CASA and Regional Airspace and Procedures Advisory Committee conveners in April 2016.  The meeting was called by CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety Mark Skidmore after continued debate in the aviation community about the most appropriate frequency to choose when operating outside controlled airspace at or near aerodromes not marked on aeronautical charts.  CASA has previously advised that the most appropriate frequency to use in class G airspace at or near unmarked aerodromes is the VHF area frequency.  However, some pilots are still using the multicom frequency 126.7 which may be causing some confusion.  The discussion paper will be released during 2016 and CASA will be looking for everyone from sports pilots to regular public transport operators to comment on the issues.  CASA will carefully consider all viewpoints before reaching a final position on the most appropriate frequency use in class G airspace.  Until the consultation process is finalised CASA urges all pilots to follow the current advice on frequency choice in class G airspace which is to use the VHF area frequency.

Find the advisory information on operations at non-controlled aerodromes.

Project to cut maintenance rules red tape

Maintainers and operators of small aircraft are set to benefit from a review of maintenance and airworthiness related Civil Aviation Regulations.  CASA has set up a project with the aim of simplifying the regulations, cutting red tape and reducing compliance burdens.  Updating and simplifying the maintenance and airworthiness Civil Aviation Regulations is expected to cut aviation industry costs.  The review is needed as the Civil Aviation Regulations will continue to be used for some time until new small aircraft maintenance provisions are introduced into the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations.  Feedback from the maintenance sector has highlighted a need to simplify and rationalise the current regulations so they reflect up-to-date aviation practices and technology.  In addition to reviewing the regulations CASA will develop associated guidance material.  While CASA will be seeking further input from maintainers and operators of small aircraft on how the current regulations can be improved, a number of areas have already been identified for action.  These include clarification that the registered operator is responsible for managing the continuing airworthiness of an aircraft, making the maintainer only responsible for completing the maintenance ordered by the operator, updating provisions for pilot maintenance and updating the rules covering welding, non-destructive inspections, weight control and loading.

Find out more about the maintenance regulations review.

Mud wasps a real risk to aircraft

An updated warning has been issued by CASA about the dangers of mud wasp infestation of aircraft.  It can take mud wasps as little as 20 minutes to build a significant nest which can block a pitot tube, vent or drain.  In 2013 an Airbus A330 had a rejected take-off in Brisbane due to an airspeed indication failure which was only detected during the take-off roll.  During the subsequent inspection it was found the captain’s pitot probe was almost totally obstructed by an insect nest, consistent with mud-dauber wasp nest residue.  The residue was built up while the aircraft was on the ground over a two hour period parked at the loading gate.  The pitot probe covers were not installed by maintenance staff during this time.  Between 2010 and 2015, CASA received approximately 20 service difficulty reports detailing departure gate delays, aborted take-offs and air turn-back occurrences due to wasp nest infestations in the pitot tubes of large aircraft in Australia.  There have been reports from overseas of fatal accidents which have been attributed to wasp nests blocking the pitot tube, resulting in loss of airspeed indication.

Mud wasps are equally a risk to smaller aircraft.  A recent investigation found a number of wasp nests inside the wing of a Cessna 182, in the cavity formed between the rear spar and the flap fairing.  There was also one large wasp nest entirely suspended on the flight control cables in the rear fuselage.  CASA makes five recommendations about mud wasps including installing approved fuel vent screens or removable drain/vent covers and engine compartment blanks, as well as installing tight fitting pitot/static vent covers.

Read the mud wasp airworthiness bulletin.

Streamlined processes for ASIC/AVIC cards

CASA will soon be introducing streamlined processing for Aviation Security Identification Cards (ASICs) and Aviation Identification (AVIDs).  As of 23 May 2016 all applications will be processed and issued by CASA’s service provider Aviation ID Australia.  The requirements for applying for the cards will not change.  All contact regarding ASIC/AVID applications and renewals should be made to Aviation ID Australia by calling 1300 721 241 or via email at:admin@aviationidaustralia.com.au.  Information on the cards, including the application and renewal process and access to the application forms, will remain available through the CASA website, with new forms to be made available as of 23 May 2016.

Find out more about ASIC and AVID cards.

New guidelines for helicopter pilot maintenance

A new set of guidelines has been released for pilot maintenance of class B piston engine helicopters.  Class B aircraft are not certified to transport category standards or used in regular public transport operations.  The guidelines provide a sample 50 hourly checklist, which includes an example of a maintenance release.  CASA identified the need for the information during recent surveillance of remote helicopter operations.  It was evident some operators required guidance on the requirements on how to correctly certify for the 50 hourly inspection and unscheduled maintenance on their rotorcraft.  Helicopter 50 hourly inspections may also require the completion of specific engine service instructions.  CASA recommends that pilots follow the guidelines along with the limitations and instructions provided within CASA Schedule 8, which is contained in the Civil Aviation Regulations.  Schedule 8 sets out the maintenance a pilot is permitted to carry out on a class B aircraft.  Pilots must obtain an approval from their local CASA office prior to performing any maintenance activities not specified in Schedule 8.  The sample 50 hourly check list covers approved data and parts, tools, defects, record keeping and recurring maintenance.

Go to the helicopter pilot maintenance airworthiness bulletin.

Comment now on fatigue rule proposals

Further consultation is underway on proposed changes to the new rules covering fatigue management for flight crew.  The package of proposed changes will reduce the costs of complying with the new fatigue rules and lessen the impact on operations.  If adopted the amendments to Civil Aviation Order 48.1 would allow more air operators to use the most basic prescriptive fatigue limitations rather than the more complex ‘tier 2’ appendices .  It would also means these operators would not have to develop a full fatigue risk management system.  The option of using a fatigue risk management system will still be available.  Proposed changes include introducing new sets of fatigue limitations available to medical transport and emergency service operations, ballooning operations and for daylight only aerial work operations such as helicopter mustering.  Each set will take into account the specific operating characteristics of these sectors.  These proposals were developed by CASA after extensive consultation with each sector.  Other proposals are clarifying that in-flight rest facilities must be comfortable enough for flight crew to sleep, a less prescriptive definition of suitable sleeping accommodation for aerial work activities, further clarification of off-duty period requirements and clarifying when the fatigue rules do not apply to private operations.  The package of proposed changes follows the earlier adoption of a revised transition period for the new fatigue rules, which requires compliance by 1 May 2017 for organisations that held an air operator’s certificate before the rules took effect.

Get the details of the fatigue rule changes and comment before 11 May 2016

Workshops to support fatigue rule transition

A series of workshops are being held to support air operators in their transition to the new fatigue rules.  The workshops will play a key role in getting operators ready to meet the fatigue deadlines over the next year.  By no later than 31 October 2016 air operators must submit a draft and updated operations manual taking into account the new fatigue rules or an application for a fatigue risk management system.  This is to allow adequate time to make the transition to the new rules by the 1 May 2017 deadline.  To help operators CASA is running workshops at multiple locations from May to July 2016.  Each one-day workshop will include an overview of the new fatigue rules, a step-by-step guide to updating an operations manual (including activities to develop an action plan), information on how to work under multiple fatigue rule appendices, as well as providing useful tools and resources.  There will also be an overview of how to implement a fatigue risk management system.  This is a great opportunity for aviation personnel to talk with CASA’s fatigue management project staff, meet with a local CASA inspector, and have fatigue questions answered to ensure a smooth transition.

Find the fatigue workshop locations and book a place now

Regional safety management in focus

Three special workshops on safety management systems for small, non-complex aviation organisations are being held in regional Australia in May 2016.  The workshops are at Alice Springs, Cairns and Rockhampton.  They are part of a program of education and support for regional aviation organisations wanting to learn about developing and implementing a safety management system.  The workshops are interactive, with plenty of time for questions and feedback.  They cost $50 per person, which makes a contribution to running costs.  Each participant will be given a copy of the latest edition of the safety management system resource kit, which is essential for anyone setting up a new system or updating an existing system.  The resource kit is written in plain language and has templates and guides for implementing safety management systems.  Two more safety management system workshops will be held in June 2016 at Albany and Kununurra.

Book your place in a regional safety management workshop.

Updates to remotely piloted aircraft rules

Regulatory requirements for a sector of the booming remotely piloted aircraft industry are being eased.  Commercial operators of very small remotely piloted aircraft will no longer need to obtain regulatory approvals such as an operator’s certificate and a remote pilot licence.  The changes, which take effect from 29 September 2016, apply to remotely piloted aircraft used in commercial operations weighing less than two kilograms maximum take-off weight.  These operators will need to notify CASA that they intend to use very small remotely piloted aircraft for commercial flights and must operate according to a set of standard operating conditions.  These mandatory conditions include flying only in day visual line of sight, below 120 metres, keeping more than 30 metres away from other people, flying more than 5.5 kilometres from controlled aerodromes and not operating near emergency situations.  An online system will be used by the commercial operators of very small remotely piloted aircraft to notify CASA of their operations.  The package of changes made to the regulations covering remotely piloted aircraft also permits private landholders to carry out a range of activities on their own land without the need for approvals from CASA.  This includes remotely piloted aircraft up to 25 kilograms in weight where no money is paid for flights.  CASA is finalising a series of advisory circulars covering remotely piloted aircraft operations.  These will cover training and licensing, operators and operations, general information and the sub-two kilogram class.

Get the details of remotely piloted aircraft rule changes.

Get a lesson to save your life

CASA is scheduled to hold safety seminars for pilots at up to 13 locations around the nation during May 2016.  Lessons for life seminars are planned for Mildura, Inverell, Armidale, Mareeba, Innisfail, Port Lincoln, Port Pirie, Mudgee, Kalgoorlie, Camden, Bankstown, Alice Springs and Ayers Rock.  Seminars will focus on key safety issues that continue to feature in accidents such as flight in low visibility, unplanned or unapproved low flying, pilot incapacitation and weather.  Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation reports nominate these issues as top safety concerns.  There will be a discussion about at least one case study from accident reports.  Other issues may be discussed such as regulatory changes, pilot responsibilities in relation to maintenance releases and correct procedures to follow at non-controlled aerodromes.  The seminars also provide an important opportunity for pilots to give feedback and suggestions to CASA.

Find an AvSafety seminar near you.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.



Know the Rules:

flying-with-control-model

It just gets better!

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Notification of rule amendment - Civil Aviation Legislation Amendment (Part 101) Regulation 2016 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED

CASA wishes to advise that Civil Aviation Legislation Amendment (Part 101) Regulation 2016 has been registered on the Federal Register of Legislation.

This regulation amends the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998, Civil Aviation (Fees) Regulations 1995, Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 and Transport Safety Investigation Act 2003 to align with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) terminology, in particular by replacing the term 'unmanned aerial vehicle' (UAV) with 'remotely piloted aircraft' (RPA).

Key outcomes introduced by the Regulation include simplified regulatory requirements for lower risk RPA operations and an allowance for more detailed operational matters to be dealt with in a Manual of Standards, providing greater flexibility and responsiveness in a rapidly evolving area. More specifically, the Regulation establishes a set of standard operating conditions for RPA, categorisations for RPA according to weight or, in the case of airships, envelope capacity, and introduces the concept of 'excluded RPA' to represent RPA operations considered to be lower risk, as determined by RPA category and operational use. Excluded RPA have reduced regulatory requirements, such as not needing an operator's certificate or a remote pilot licence (RePL).

The Regulation permits private landowners to carry out some commercial-like operations on their own land under the 'standard RPA operating conditions' without requiring them to hold an Unmanned Aircraft Operator's Certificate (UOC) or RePL, if using an RPA weighing up to 25 kg provided that none of the parties involved receive remuneration. For RPA weighing between 25 kg to 150 kg, the operator needs to hold a remote pilot licence in the category of aircraft being flown.

The Regulation requires a person operating, or conducting operations using, a very small RPA for hire or reward to notify CASA rather than being required to obtain a UOC and RePL. The Regulation makes it an offence for a person to operate a very small RPA for hire or reward without notifying CASA and also allows CASA to establish and maintain a database of information that relates to these notifications.

The Regulation inserts new definitions into Part 1 of the CASR Dictionary and adds remote pilots, UOC holders, and people permitted to operate commercially without authorisations to the list of persons in Part 117 of CASR who must respond to CASA's surveys.

Autonomous flight is prohibited under the amendments until such time as suitable regulations can be developed by CASA. However there is scope for autonomous flight to be approved by CASA on a case-by-case basis in the meantime.

The Regulation broadens the eligibility for an RePL by not specifically requiring an Aeronautical Radio Operator's Certificate, enabling the holder of an equivalent qualification to meet the required standards in respect of radio communications. The Regulation also amends the Transport Safety Investigation (Voluntary and Confidential Reporting Scheme) Regulation 2012 to update the terminology from 'UAV' to 'RPA', thereby ensuring that the voluntary and confidential reporting (REPCON) scheme applies in relation to remotely piloted aircraft.

The instrument and explanatory statement are available on the Federal Register of Legislation at https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2016L00400




From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore

Regulating RPAs for safer operations

Australian Association for Unmanned Systems - keynote Address

Canberra - 7 March 2016

Thank you for the warm introduction. I would like to welcome everyone to the conference - a good turnout. We–CASA and industry–must remain focused to deliver outcomes that promote safety as our number one priority. Events such as this conference are very important for us to share experiences so that we all hear different viewpoints and act in unison to achieve our number one priority - aviation safety.

Civil aviation operates within a framework of ICAO’s technical and operational standards and recommended practices (SARPs), which are currently based on having a pilot on board operating the aircraft. The SARPs are the technical and operational existing controls, which in conjunction with airspace design and classification underpin safe and efficient flying operations in national airspace systems. Most Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) do not comply with many or any of these existing controls, which means they will introduce new safety risks to the aviation system.

Australia was the first country in the world to regulate RPAS when it published Civil Aviation Safety Regulation 1998 (CASR) Part 101 in 2002, which, when drafted, dealt with the technology of the time. CASR Part 101 treats both small and large RPAS similarly, with some additional requirements for large RPAS and allows operations both within and outside controlled airspace.

From CASA’s perspective, obviously the consideration of safety comes to the forefront of our decisions. Just reflect for a moment, if a certified operator uses a RPA for lifesaving patrols, for example to assist in the rescue of a drowning swimmer, there will be a positive public perception on our approvals. But it won’t be the same if one gets sucked into the engine of an Airbus on take-off.

Therefore, as Australia’s aviation regulator, we have an important part to play in setting practical and effective regulation of RPAs in the civil airspace.

Growth of the RPA and CASA’s focus on safety

Aviation is a dynamic environment, internationally and domestically and there are always a number of challenges for CASA and the aviation industry at large. While these challenges vary, both the industry and the regulator need to ensure that safety related considerations are given due notice. In the case of RPAs, this means ensuring the safety of any other airspace user as well as the safety of persons and property on the ground.

This sector has emerged as the most dynamic growth sector of the world aerospace industry this decade. Globally, civilian RPAs are set to become big business, eventually exceeding the defence market. By 2020 alone, the unmanned sector is projected to grow between 200 to 500 per cent. It is expected that the private sector will grow even more, but it is difficult to gauge exactly how many private RPAs will be flying in the future.

In February 2012, there were 15 holders of RPA Operators’ Certificates in Australia operating small RPAs for commercial purposes. Currently we have 459 approved operators on our books and anticipate having in excess of 600 approved by the end of June this year.

Whilst there is still a lot of growth in the small RPAS sector, there is also a notable increase in the growth of medium RPAS wanting to undertake complex operations, for example the recently announced Westpac mini-helicopter drone that will act as both a shark spotter along the NSW coastline and a life saver in rescue missions in bush, snow and sea. These are often military grade systems which are looking to the civilian world for new markets. Of significant concern, is that the capabilities and technology of RPAS are increasing faster than the regulations.

The problem for us is the extraordinary rate that these small RPAs are proliferating into the Australian airspace. With the prices as low as $400, anyone can buy a small, high performance multi-rotor RPA, equipped with high definition live stream video cameras, GPS, autopilot, and with decent flight time.

Not only will the magnitude of this sector grow, but so too will the complexity and diversity of airframes and aerial activity as well as the issues associated with the required volume of regulations and level of regulatory oversight which could be categorised as unchartered territory for CASA.

Key challenges CASA will encounter into the future in the RPA sector will be:

·         substitution of RPAs for conventional and emerging aerial work tasks and roles;

·         complete integration of RPAs into airspace;

·         carriage of cargo by RPAs; and

·         eventually the carriage of passengers in RPT operations by RPAs (Ehang 184 air taxi).

Prior to these activities becoming mainstream operations, standards and regulations must be developed in their entirety with supporting guidance material in collaboration with the entities that are likely to be affected by the proposed regulations. While the unequivocal focus as laid out by the CA Act needs to be safety, CASA must not only be socially competent but also responsive in its attempt to proceed without inhibiting the growth or potential of this rapidly growing sector which will continue to dominate the future of aviation for a long time. Balancing these principles is a huge challenge for CASA.

Our understanding is that approximately 90 per cent of the RPAs operating in Australia today are less than 7 Kgs are relatively inexpensive and easily accessible to individuals through the open market. As you would appreciate, due to increasing numbers and their varied capabilities, it is impossible for CASA to effectively regulate all of them.

We have to address the current reality. There is no point in CASA writing regulations that can't be enforced. Therefore, CASA is in the process of writing some rules it can control.

CASA’s approach for an updated regulatory framework

The principal objective in updating the regulation is to make it more relevant to the latest technology, make it more efficient and to enable a wider range of routine operational activities (i.e night operations).

CASR Part 101 currently divides RPA into small and large, based on a weight break of 150 kg (100 kg for rotorcraft). This 150 kg weight limit was arbitrarily based on the then category of ‘giant model aircraft’ and is not risk-based.

The entry control criteria will be assessed to more appropriately match with the level of complexity and risk posed by the applicant’s proposed operation. The current regulation is based on weight and to some extents, operational factors. We are trying to move towards a more operationally-based risk approach, rather than a prescriptive one based on weight, which in many cases is only a minor factor in determining the risk of an operation.

CASA is changing Part 101 and expects to implement the amended regulations in late 2016. Accompanying the amendments will be a Manual of Standards (MOS) following consideration by the joint CASA/industry Sub-committee, the wider industry and the general public. I will leave the Team Leader RPAS, Scott Duffy who is scheduled to talk in this forum to cover details.

Talking of future regulations, we are in the process of identifying the risks associated with different levels of weight and speed of the RPAs, based on the potential for harm to people on the ground, damage to property, or damage to other aircraft (in a way similar to a bird strike).

It is proposed that RPA will be divided into groups characterised by their weight. So far the work we have done leads us to believe that only RPA above a certain weight and outside certain operating conditions carry a heightened level of risk and therefore require a CASA approval.

RPA that are very small, for example less than 2kg would not require any approval, as RPA of this size are considered to pose a low risk and low potential for harm.

Large RPA will attract more stringent controls and will face greater scrutiny, for example, the Scan Eagle weighs about 20kg and is capable of flying to New Zealand. Therefore, in the interest of safety, it is prudent that the operator will be licensed, have a full risk assessment, and the operation will be treated like a conventionally-piloted aircraft.

This thinking is at an early stage, but certainly there is potential to have some constructive dialogue about this proposal. Again, I will leave Scott to provide more details in his presentation.

In other words CASA is trying to write some rules it can control without compromising safety.

Broader use of RPAs and integration with airspace

The use of RPAS will continue to expand as technologies and performance characteristics become better understood. Improved long duration flights, covert operational capabilities, and reduced operational costs serve as natural benefits to many communities, such as law-enforcement, agriculture and environmental sectors. As technologies develop, mature and become able to meet defined standards and regulations, RPA roles could expand to include more complex operations and eventually possibly even carrying passengers.

Any significant expansion will also depend upon the development and certification of technologies required to enable the safe and seamless integration of RPA into all classes of airspace. I am speaking here of the technologies relating to detect and avoid and to be seen and communicate with other aircraft and air traffic control.

Australian airspace is administered and regulated so that it is used safely consistent with ICAO standards. When making airspace decisions to integrate RPAS, CASA must also consider protection of the environment, airspace efficiency, equitable access for other airspace users and national security.

However, we will need to challenge the operational foundations of the airspace system which were originally drafted premised upon aircraft with pilots on board who are able to detect and avoid other aircraft and which were fitted with appropriate communications, navigation and surveillance equipment for each class of airspace.

The demand for small RPA flying visual line-of-sight for law enforcement, survey work, and aerial photography and video will continue to grow. Larger and more complex RPA, able to undertake more challenging tasks, will most likely begin to operate in controlled airspace where all traffic is known and where ATC is able to provide separation from other traffic.

CASA and industry must remain cognisant that RPA operations do not increase the risks to other airspace users, particularly passenger transport operations or to other airspace users who may be are unaware of the increased risk.

Integration of RPAS could conceivably lead to routine unmanned commercial cargo flights one day. In particular, the low weight/low volume parcel forwarding industry could be revolutionised by RPAs. Already Amazon, Google and Australia Post have been testing solutions to provide unmanned delivery of products. I hear that FEDEX has an application with the FAA for an unmanned Boeing 747 for cargo operations. While it is unlikely to be approved for some time, it is interesting to note where the future might be going.

Further, the literature review indicates that in 2030, it will be common to look up and see unmanned aircraft flying overhead enroute to a delivery. It is anticipated by 2030, UAS will be completely integrated into the airspace we know today, and interact with manned aircraft in a similar manner to how manned aircraft interact today. RPAs will also be a common sight below 400ft above ground level (AGL), used for surveillance, freight and delivery services as well as maintenance of infrastructure.

Currently, requests for Beyond Visual Line of Sight Area (BVLOS) approvals are increasing in frequency and complexity, requiring solutions to enable flights in controlled and non-controlled airspace. These are being dealt with on a case by case basis by our RPAS unit with the assistance of the Office of Airspace Regulation (OAR) who establish danger areas and restricted airspace when required.

While CASA doesn’t have clear regulation in support of BVLOS operations, and more specifically airworthiness standards, CASA is still able to support the RPAS industry in developing BVLOS operations. The key limitations on broader use of RPAS is the lack of limited airworthiness standards and lack of limited information on reliable and high performing detect and avoid systems. There is also the lack of aircraft/system reliability data (including fail-safe systems), the lack of robust standards for aircraft communication, navigation, surveillance and telemetry and the need to meet current performance standards for on board equipment, much of which is too large and heavy to be easily integrated into RPAS. Many of these are technological issues that can only be resolved through international efforts and technology development.

CASA’s regulatory philosophy provides the opportunity for future regulations like CASR Part 102–commercial and large operations – to be risk based, graduated and proportionate, and able to consider reasonable alternative approaches in fulfilling regulatory requirements, as long as they do not compromise safety. This approach ensures that the dividends in safety, efficiency and cost reductions that can be leveraged from the utility and capability of remotely piloted aircraft are realised.

Prior to clearance being given for a widespread increase in RPAS operations in all classes of airspace, the work to develop regulations and standards to integrate with other airspace users must be completed. This can be a graduated process and should not predicate on any assumptions.

One of the key tasks, however, is mitigating the risk of not having a pilot on board which will need to be fully explored and developed. It may be necessary that technology allowing detect and avoid must come to maturity on a commercially available scale. Equally consideration to how such aerial systems comply with existing ATM procedures needs to be comprehensively developed. With the maturity of this industry segment, including the completion of the future regulations, the integration of RPAs in the airspace can occur congruent with the Airspace Act 2007 requirements safely integrating the operations of all airspace users.

Close interaction with ICAO and other international bodies

CASA continues to support the development of ICAO regulation and SARPs. CASA is a member of the ICAO RPAS Panel, which is developing standards and recommended practices for RPAS on a global level. So far, the Panel had amendments approved for Rules of the Air, Aircraft Nationality and Registration Marks, and Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation annexes. Further operational and licensing SARPs are being prepared, along with airworthiness and air traffic services. Current projections will see ICAO deliver new rules and amendments to the annexes from 2018 onwards.

As the regulator, we need to develop procedures and processes consistently taking into account the work of ICAO, JARUS and other NAA such as FAA, EASA, UKCAA, DGCA France and Transport Canada and the leading manufacturers of RPAS from the US, Europe and Asia. We do this because we want Australia to benefit from the potential of RPAS, both in a technology development sense and for what it can add to the efficiency, effectiveness and safety of other industries, such as agriculture, forestry, power and water distribution, and emergency services.

Our education and communication effort

I believe that a modern regulator should engage, educate and enforce fairly and proportionately, and only when necessary. In keeping with this broad framework, we have made a significant progress in developing a communication strategy focusing on safe practice when using RPAs. The aim of the strategy is to reduce the number of recorded RPA aviation occurrences and to prevent serious accidents involving RPAs.

The primary target audiences are RPA operators/UOC holders and new RPA operators. Secondary audiences are manned aircraft operators, general aviation pilots, model aircraft enthusiasts, police forces, local governments, firefighters, and electronics and hobby retailers.

It is my intent that along with the introduction of new regulations governing RPA operations, communication activity for RPAs will significantly increase with a range of activities designed to explain the rules in plain English. This will include a video, increased social media activity, revised web content and advertising in niche publications. In addition to this, development of a mobile device application with interactive maps is being explored with CASA’s IT Branch.

Let me delve into some details of our current and future planned activities.

·         In 2013 the ‘Flying with control’ flyer outlining the rules for flying RPAs was first produced. Since that time, 200,000 copies of the flyer have been distributed to retailers such as Harvey Norman, Hobbyco and Jaycar for distribution at the point-of sale in the lead up to Christmas. Major retailers have been very cooperative in disseminating the information. We have also distributed flyers to manufacturers i.e. Parrot, DJI Phantom and Arilabs for placement inside the product packaging.

·         Further in 2014, in collaboration with the National Aerial Firefighting Centre and state firefighting agencies, the ‘Don’t go there’ flyer was produced, highlighting the dangers of flying RPAs near bushfires. The flyer was distributed via state and regional fire brigades and at several events held during the season.

·         In 2015, a new campaign titled ‘If you fly, they can’t’ is underway in partnership with the National Aerial Firefighting Centre. The campaign highlighted the danger of flying RPAs in bushfire zones. It was launched on 29 September via social media – primarily Facebook. Since the launch, it has reached over 430,000 people. The cost of this campaign was only $700.

The RPA website has also been updated with information about RPAs and emergencies. Since October 2015, our RPA safety messages have reached nearly 3 million via CASA’s social media channels.

In 2016 broader education activities targeting schools and local government are planned (just in late February, CASA participated in the Royal Canberra Show). This includes work with research and industry organisations, such as Queensland’s Australian Centre for Aerospace Automation to promote safe flying of RPAs.

Consultation and collaboration

CASA’s engagement with the aviation community forms a significant part of our standards development, and our educational, advisory and operational activities. I value the importance of maintaining a meaningful, collaborative and mutually respectful relationship with the aviation community. For this to happen, we need an environment within which we can work together in a collaborative and cohesive manner and this is what I’m championing within CASA.

I would like to see CASA and industry forming a strong and appropriate ‘safety partnership’ where we all play our roles in getting the best from the aviation safety system. I firmly believe that by collaborating, we will get the right safety outcomes from regulations and regulatory practices that support a vibrant and strong Australian aviation community.

The idea is to engage with our stakeholders at the grassroots level to fully understand the underlying aviation safety issues and problems faced by the aviation community and ensure CASA’s responsibilities have been identified – in fact this forum in one such opportunity.

Development of the complete regulatory framework for RPA will be a lengthy effort, it is an evolutionary process, with regulations being added or amended gradually. Our chief method of working with industry is through our UAS sub-committee, consisting of members from all sectors of the industry and government agencies. Working groups are attached to the committee and they provide advice on particular issues as needed.

We are also planning formal flight trials of different types of operations, for example BVLOS operations and equipment including detect and avoid systems to establish minimum operating standards for different types of RPAS operations.

We are currently looking at trial options under Part 149, where a basic training organisation will hold an Instrument of Delegation to perform limited RPAS related entry-control functions. If the trial is successful CASA will look at expanding this option to other organisations.

We are also looking at avenues to promote self-administering arrangements similar to the sport and recreational sector where we have had initial discussion with some associations.

In moving forward, CASA will look to less formal authorisation processes and rely on generic rules and requirements for risk management and working towards an integration of commercial and private operations to overcome historical problems and anomalies in the regulations.

Closing remarks

CASA recognises the needs of the industry to be able to develop and use RPA in the Australian airspace in the shortest possible timeframe. The travelling public and people in the aviation community all expect safety to come first – we must deliver the appropriate safety outcomes for all sectors of aviation. But at the same time CASA must work to keep the regulatory burden as reasonable as possible. We must get the right safety outcomes without unintended consequences, unreasonable requirements or unnecessary costs.

However, we have an obligation of allowing these operations in a manner that guards safety of other airspace users, as well as the safety of persons and property on the ground. Further, there are a significant number of technical issues for which standards have not yet been determined around the world. As I’ve said before, we will take into account international developments and where possible we will make practical and safe ways to advance the operations of RPS in the civil environment.

In closing, I commend the work AAUS is doing to look at some of the challenges posed by the rapid growth of RPA operations. Lets work together in meeting those challenges successfully to achieve better safety outcomes.

 

AMAS March 2016 General Meeting

IF YOU FLY, THEY CAN'T.

NSW Rural Fire Service has had reports of a drone flying over a bushfire near Cessnock.

Never fly a drone, model aircraft or multirotor near bushfires. While it might be tempting to record footage, you can pose a major safety risk to firefighting personnel in the air and on the ground.

More information available at casa.gov.au/rpafire

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Civil Aviation Safety Authority - CASA

Never fly a drone, model aircraft or multirotor near bushfires. While it might be tempting to record footage, you can pose a major safety risk to firefighting personnel in the air and on the ground. More info: casa.gov.au/rpafire

Lithium Battery Ban Announced.

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/2016/02/lithium-battery-ban-announced



8417

Rechargeable lithium ion batteries will no longer be permitted as cargo on passenger carrying aircraft from 1 April, following a decision by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO). Single use lithium metal batteries have been prohibited from being transported as cargo, on passenger aircraft, since 1 January 2015.

This decision applies only to lithium ion batteries being shipped as cargo, and does not apply to batteries carried by passengers in portable electronic devices, or as spares. Passenger’s spare batteries must continue to be carried as cabin baggage, so that they are readily accessible, and can be extinguished if they short circuit.

Dedicated freight aircraft will still be able to take lithium ion batteries as cargo when they have a state of charge <30% and are properly packaged, labelled, documented and declared.

The prohibition is an interim measure until a new lithium battery packaging standard can be introduced in 2018.




AMAS Inc GENERAL MEETING 18-3-16 Notice of Motion open for ammendment

24-2-16


Members,


Please be advised:


No further agenda items nor Notice of Motions have been received to date. Therefore, Notice of Motion Re: Bundaberg Aeromodellers (Annex A below) is now open to members for any amendment. Window of opportunity for amendment closes 1st March.  Voting will commence 2nd March and cease 16th March.


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary AMAS inc

0417879416






9-2-16


AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY

NOTICE OF GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Google Hangout

8:00 PM (NSW Time) Friday 18th March, 2016

at 6  Karuk Road, Bensfield NSW 2251.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. Refer Annex A.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 23rd February, 2016.

 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 24thFebruary 2016 for initial consideration .

 

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 2nd March.

 

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 2nd March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 16th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary AMAS inc

0417879416

 

 

ANNEX A:

 

From the Bundaberg Aeromodellers.

 

AMAS Inc will amend the Flight Proficiency  system to remove the Instructor Wings rating and instead replace it with a process whereby someone wanting to be tested for their solo or advanced flight proficiency  approach their club's committee. In consultation, the committee and applicant would agree on a suitable person to be appointed as a one-time assessor. The assessor would, in the opinion of the committee and/or via a vote of the club members, have all the appropriate skills and knowledge to assess the applicant, without fear or favour as to their assessing  suitability. If they pass, both the assessor and a committee member would sign the wings test and forward it onto the AMAS.

After the test, the assessor would have no further role. They are not a permanent assessor able to go on testing wings.

In the event of a dispute the AMAS Inc can be asked to appoint an assessor to conduct a flight proficiency  assessment at a suitable place and time.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority Risk Assessment Tool.

AMAS Inc General Meeting

AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY

NOTICE OF GENERAL MEETING.

 

As you know the AMAS Inc is the only aero-modeling association that offers every single member the right to participate directly and vote in the running of our organization at a national level. Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members. As a member of the AMAS Inc you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Therefore, members please be advised:

 

Live broadcast video via Google Hangout

7:00 PM (NSW Time) Friday 18th March, 2016

at 6  Karuk Road, Bensfield NSW 2251.

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items have been called for since the preceding General Meeting and are being called for now. Refer Annex A.

 

NOTICES OF MOTION & AGENDA ITEMS

 

Notices of motion and Agenda items are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS via email or conventional mail before noon on 23rd February, 2016.

 

All notices of motion received and agenda items will be forwarded to members/clubs on the 24th February 2016 for initial consideration .

 

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any notice of motion will be put to the member/club who initially submitted the motion for consideration. If the member/club agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form with any other Notices of Motion on the 2nd March.

 

The finalised Notices of Motion will be emailed on the 2nd March to members/clubs to vote for or against the motion/s. All votes are to be received by the returning officer at the office of the Secretary AMAS by noon 16th March.


Results of the Notices of Motion will be presented at the general Meeting.

 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.

 

Kind regards,

 

Mike Snabaitis.

Secretary AMAS inc

0417879416

 

 

ANNEX A:

 

From the Bundaberg Aeromodellers.

 

AMAS Inc will amend the Flight Proficiency  system to remove the Instructor Wings rating and instead replace it with a process whereby someone wanting to be tested for their solo or advanced flight proficiency  approach their club's committee. In consultation, the committee and applicant would agree on a suitable person to be appointed as a one-time assessor. The assessor would, in the opinion of the committee and/or via a vote of the club members, have all the appropriate skills and knowledge to assess the applicant, without fear or favour as to their assessing  suitability. If they pass, both the assessor and a committee member would sign the wings test and forward it onto the AMAS.

After the test, the assessor would have no further role. They are not a permanent assessor able to go on testing wings.

In the event of a dispute the AMAS Inc can be asked to appoint an assessor to conduct a flight proficiency  assessment at a suitable place and time.

Flight Safety Australia - January-February 2016 issue 108 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Flight Safety Australia January–February 2016 out now!

Download the magazine app on your Apple or Android device.

Flight Safety Australia News Site, Download in the App
Store, Download from Google Play

  

Flight Safety Australia starts the new year on a high with our feature, ‘Bringing it all together’, looking at how the shift from ground-based to digital technologies is transforming the way airspace is managed. Integrating communication, navigation and surveillance technologies is helping to create flexible skies, enabling the safe growth of global aviation.

In ‘Countdown to blast off?’ Flight Safety asks: ‘Will jetpacks finally rocket out of the pages of science fiction and into our daily lives?’ The Martin Jetpack, powered by a two-litre V4 two-stroke petrol engine, has a range of 51 km, a speed of 40 kt and a flight endurance of 30 minutes, has been certified in New Zealand under the microlight category. Flight Safety Australia looks at the implications of this technology for initial airworthiness certification.

‘Locked into error’ examines how the experienced crew of a Gulfstream IV, a modern business jet with an impeccable safety record, made a simple, yet deadly mistake, and reinforces the importance of executing checklists.

Our contributors–Kreisha Ballantyne, Thomas Turner and Adrian Park–again provide their unique perspectives on aviation safety issues. Kreisha Ballantyne’s article, ‘Partners in safety’ focuses on the value of using your passengers as a safety resource, taking advantage of their extra sets of eyes and ears. Thomas Turner gives some timely fuel management advice, while helicopter pilot, Adrian Park, in ‘As you wish, my lord’, analyses the trumping of state-of-the-art technology by circumstances, in the March 2014 UK crash involving Lord Ballyedmond’s Agusta Westland 139.

Other stories look at ‘a bad, bad thing’–water in fuel; and passengers who reach for their bags in aircraft evacuations. The popular close calls segment, with audio; and the trio of quizzes complete the edition.

Flight Safety Australia’s January–February edition is now live: download the iPad app from the App Store, or the Android app from Google Play to your tablet and enjoy the interactive magazine experience, complete with video and audio. And don’t forget that these stories will also appear over the life of the issue, (January-February) on www.flightsafetyaustralia.com




Australia Post: Changes to delivery times and costs.

Starting today, the costs and delivery times associated with mail through Australia Post will increase. We ask that our members keep these new costs and delivery time-frames in mind when requesting information from our office as we're now well equipped to deliver most of our information digitally.

CASA BRIEFING: December 2015

CASA Briefing

December 2015

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore

I have begun the process of renewing CASA through a major change program which will deliver more effective safety regulation and better regulatory services for all sectors of the Australian aviation community. The change program is in line with the Government’s response to recommendation 21 of the Aviation Safety Regulation Review, which called for a client-oriented organisational model. The changes will bring together complementary functions within CASA and are being phased in by the middle of 2016. One of the important goals of the restructure is to improve our communication with the aviation community. A lot of the feedback I have received over the last year has told me that the way CASA interacts with the aviation community at all levels must lift and now is the time to start delivering real change. Part of this real change will be the introduction of more online services to streamline the application, processing and delivery of as many services as possible. The restructure will create three main groups – stakeholder engagement, aviation, and sustainability. The stakeholder engagement group will bring together all communication functions into one area to ensure CASA’s communication and information is consistent and delivered effectively to all stakeholders. The aviation group will manage and deliver all collaboration and interaction with the aviation community. This includes entry control, surveillance, regulatory services, standards setting, regulatory development and regulatory implementation. The sustainability group includes all support functions, both internal and external.

As Christmas and the holidays draw close I wish everyone an enjoyable and above all safe festive season. In most of Australia this can be a great time to go flying and if I get the chance that is certainly what I will be doing. Whatever type of aircraft you fly, in whatever category of operations, please remember to plan carefully, comply with the rules and operate within your own personal limitations. There is a wealth of safety information and tools on our web site to help everyone, with OnTrack and Out-n-Back two resources many pilots will find very useful. The visual flight rules guide is also online and is invaluable when refreshing information or checking on requirements. I look forward to 2016 and getting another opportunity to meet and hear from as many people as I can across the aviation community.

Safe flying, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Mark Skidmore

OnTrack

Out-n-Back

Visual flight rules guide online

Purchase a copy of the guide


Flight Safety Australia 2015 highlights out now

A special collector’s edition of the best from Flight Safety Australia during 2015 is now available. There are 168 pages of informative reading bringing together articles from the year’s digital editions. All of the 2015 feature articles are included, as well as the best of the general articles and close calls. There is a great selection of articles on airworthiness, aviation medicine and accident analysis. The publication is a high quality coffee table style book and only costs $15 to cover the postage and handling fee. The Flight Safety Australia 2015 Collectors’ Edition can be ordered through the CASA online store from Monday 14 December 2015. There are 17 of the always popular ‘close call’ articles, five stories covering maintenance and six pages of quizzes. CASA’s Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore, says people across the aviation community have told him Flight Safety Australia is highly regarded as a source of credible, informative and comprehensive aviation safety information. “While many people have got the Flight Safety Australia app and read the digital magazine when it is published every second month, others have been asking for a publication that brings together all the highlights and that is what we have delivered for 2015,” Mr Skidmore says.

Order your copy of the Flight Safety Australia 2015 Collector’s edition now.

To read Flight Safety Australia every two months subscribe and download the app.

Solutions to making mustering safer

Sixteen risks specific to the aerial mustering sector have been identified in a special new study. The study has put forward actions to address the risks and improve the safety of aerial mustering. Risks include the lack of a visible CASA presence at locations where mustering is carried out, checking and testing pilots with inappropriate or inadequate operational experience conducting checks on mustering pilots, inadequate provision of mentoring and supervision for pilots with low flying hours, loss of control in flight leading to a deviation from an intended flight path and a lack of understanding of human factors issues. Solutions include surveillance sweeps by CASA, improving mustering specific regulations, an industry mentoring program, pilot training manuals or handbooks and fatigue training.

The detailed analysis of the mustering sector was undertaken jointly by CASA and key industry representatives in a sector risk profile. These profiles present a picture of the key risks facing a sector and are completed as part of CASA’s function to monitor safety performance, identify safety trends and to develop and promote safety improvements. The responsibility for implementing safety improvements lies with both CASA and the aviation industry. The next step is to jointly develop a set of mustering practice statements covering mentoring and supervision, pilot decision making, radio frequency use, fatigue, establishment of regional forums and an annual mustering sector conference. A working group of CASA and mustering representatives will work on these themes. There are more than 134 mustering operators and more than 1000 pilots working in the sector which is unique to Australian aviation.

Read the mustering sector risk profile report.

Multi-crew pilot requirements eased

CASA is making it easier for pilots who need to meet new multi-crew cooperation training requirements. As of 1 September 2015, pilots wanting to conduct multi-crew operations for the first time must complete a course of training in multi-crew cooperation and have a multi-crew type rating. Feedback to CASA from the aviation community was that this is not necessary for pilots who have already completed acceptable training elsewhere. As a result a new exemption has been issued recognising a number of other ways pilots can meet the requirements. These include having completed a European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) approved multi-crew cooperation training course, or holding an EASA multi-crew type rating or an Australian Defence Force operational conversion for multi-crew aircraft. Pilots can also benefit from the exemption if they have sufficient experience in air transport or charter multi-crew operations or meet other multi-crew operational experience requirements. Pilots applying for an air transport pilot licence who want to have their alternative multi-crew cooperation training recognised will need to include evidence of that training with their licence application form when it is submitted to CASA. These pilots are also encouraged to provide this evidence to the flight examiner who is conducting their flight test.

Find out more about the multi-crew changes.

Corrosion warning for Victa Airtourer

Operators and maintainers of all Victa Airtourer aircraft have been warned of possible structural corrosion in the main fuselage longerons. Longerons are part of the structure of the aircraft which add rigidity and strength to the frame and create a point of attachment for other structural supports, as well as the skin of the aircraft. In an airworthiness bulletin CASA states corrosion in the Victa AirTourer longerons can severely reduce the structural integrity of the aircraft. Corrosion has been found in the lower fuselage longerons in the area of the steel splice, which are major structural elements. CASA recommends gaining access to the interior of the aft fuselage and carrying out a detailed inspection of the main fuselage left and right longerons. Any signs of corrosion or missing rivets should be investigated further. Appropriate engineering advice should be sought before further flight if corrosion, missing rivets or structural deformation is evident. All instances of corrosion should be reported to CASA through the service defect reporting system. There are currently 74 Victa Airtourer aircraft registered in Australia. The aircraft is certified for a wide range of aerobatic manoeuvres.

Full details in the Victa Airtourer airworthiness bulletin.

Extra time for fatigue rules transition

Air operators are being given an extra year to make the transition to the new fatigue rules. This follows consultation with the aviation community that found both CASA and air operators needed more time to make a smooth and safe transition to Civil Aviation Order 48.1. The transition period now extends to 1 May 2017 - four years after the new rules were made. Air operators can move across to the new rules at any time during the transition period. All operators that have not completed the transition by 31 October 2016 will need to submit amended operations manuals or a fatigue risk management application to CASA by that date.

To support the requirement to move to the modernised fatigue system CASA has released a new video and a report on the science behind fatigue management. The seven minute video featuring a number of fatigue experts sets out some of the reasons for changing the rules, highlighting the importance of effective fatigue management in aviation and providing real examples of the consequences of fatigue. The video has been released along with a 16 page review which sets out the scientific support for Civil Aviation Order 48.1. The review covers International Civil Aviation Organization fatigue requirements, relevant accident and incident data, research supporting the changes, comparison with aviation regulations elsewhere in the world and prescriptive rules versus a fatigue risk management system. CASA examined more than 200 fatigue studies, research papers and reports in developing the new rules. The latest peer reviewed scientific studies of fatigue were assessed, with the provisions of Civil Aviation Order 48.1 specifically developed to address key fatigue hazards. The old fatigue rules have their origin back in the 1950s and reflect what was known about sleep and fatigue at that time. New rules were needed to take into account the nature of aviation operations in the modern world.

View the fatigue video on CASA’s YouTube channel.

Read the report on the case for the change of the fatigue rules.

Rescue and firefighting standards under review

A comprehensive review of the standards applied to aerodrome rescue and firefighting services is underway. The review will identify improvements to be made to the manual of standards for Part 139H of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations. It is needed to address unnecessary costs and operational burdens imposed by the existing rescue and firefighting standards. Consideration will be given to replacing prescriptive standards and practices with performance based alternatives to allow flexibility and reduce costs. There are also standards that exceed international requirements without clear justification and standards and practices that do not reflect current operating requirements. The current rules have created a high workload for service providers and CASA due to the need for exemptions. Improvements to the manual of standards will improve compliance while maintaining safety standards. CASA is planning to issue a notice of proposed rule-making to set out options for improvements to the standards. In developing options CASA will look at best international practice, identify key challenges facing aerodrome rescue and firefighting and complete a gap analysis of current Australian standards and International Civil Aviation Organization standards.

Find out more about the aerodrome rescue and firefighting review.

Comment now on large helicopter maintenance proposals

There’s more time to comment on proposals to change the maintenance arrangements for large transport category helicopters used in charter operations. The aviation community is being asked to respond to a notice of proposed rule-making by 31 January 2016. CASA is proposing to extend the application of Civil Aviation Safety Regulations Parts 42 and 145 to large helicopters used in charter. Part 42 covers continuing airworthiness requirements for aircraft, while Part 145 sets the standards for approved maintenance organisations. Both parts currently only apply to regular public transport operations. If CASA’s proposals go ahead charter operators of large transport helicopters will be required to get a continuing airworthiness management organisation approval. Only maintenance organisations approved under Part 145 will be able to provide maintenance services for these helicopters. The notice of proposed rule-making says the level of risk associated with large charter helicopter operations has risen, particularly in off-shore operations. Higher levels of safety would be provided by clear and concise continuing airworthiness requirements and the high standards of maintenance provided by Part 145 maintenance organisations. CASA acknowledges there will be increased costs, but believes the long term safety benefits should offset that impost. Initially the change would be implemented on a voluntary basis, followed by a transition period of several years.

Read the large helicopter maintenance proposals and have your say.

Last days to have your say on CASA’s performance

The important new survey being conducted to benchmark the aviation community’s views about CASA closes on 18 December 2015. The online survey takes about 15 minutes to complete and covers CASA’s key performance areas. Views are sought on CASA’s performance in specific areas such as efficiency, responsiveness, accountability and timeliness. Questions cover how easy it is to comply with regulations, the development of new regulations, consistency of decision making and satisfaction with service delivery. Overall, the survey aims to determine the strengths and weaknesses of CASA’s relationship with the aviation community. Results will be used by CASA’s Board and management to improve CASA’s performance, build stronger working connections with the aviation community and lift service delivery. The survey is being conducted online by an independent market research organisation, all responses are held securely and participants can choose to be anonymous. This survey will be run every two years so CASA can measure changes in performance and interaction with the aviation community. The survey meets recommendation eight of the Aviation Safety Regulation Review.

Make sure your views are heard and complete the survey now.

CASA services closed over Christmas

All CASA offices will be closed for the Christmas-New Year holidays. This means no CASA services will be available from close of business Thursday 24 December 2015 until Monday 4 January. Services such as the issue of licences and medical certificates or aircraft registration will not be available. Anyone who anticipates needing any CASA services over the Christmas-New Year period must contact CASA straight away. Leaving service requests until the days before Christmas is likely to mean applications cannot be processed before the shutdown. CASA staff will be available to help with urgent aviation safety matters during the Christmas-New Year period - but please limit enquiries to matters that need immediate attention. For urgent help over the holidays call: 131 757 and follow the prompts.

CASA’s online self-service facility will still be available over the holidays, allowing contact details to be updated and maintenance personnel and air navigation services licence details to be viewed. Forms can also be submitted and the status of service requests can be viewed.

Find out more about the Christmas-New Year arrangements.

Go to CASA online self-service.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.




AMAS Inc CHRISTMAS EDITION NEWSLETTER

Can be found here.

Communiqué from the President. Nov 15

EXCITING DEVELOPMENT 

 

Just as the the AMAS Committee tasked three different Brokers for the best policies available at the 

end of the last financial year we asked our present Broker to continue to search for policies offering 

greater benefits and savings for our members in the current and coming financial year. 

This breakthrough has been achieved through CGU,a well known and established company, so we 

would like to thank our Broker, Goldsworthy Invesments, for their diligent efforts in making this 

transition possible.

 

NEW PUBLIC LIABILITY/BODILY INJURY INSURANCE POLICY. 

Effective last Friday 27th November 2015. A copy of the PDS is now up on our website and the Committee 

recommends that you take the time to read same to ensure it continues to meet your needs. 

In brief this Public liability/bodily Injury policy covers all forms of Recreational Model Aircraft 

(as defined in the CASA regulations) activities, subject to the same conditions which were applicable 

to the previous policy and of course still covers R/C Model Cars and Boats. 

With an Excess Fee of only $500 as compared to other policies with an excess of $5000 or $2500, 

we are able to pass on the savings to you, and in the unfortunate event of having to make a claim your 

contribution would be only $200. Rest assured that the AMAS Committee, in conjunction with our broker, 

will continue to research all future options with regard to the ever changing insurance market and conditions, in order to best protect our members and clubs and will continue to strive for further benefits for our ever increasing 

membership. We will also take this opportunity to welcome our new FPV racing groups.

 

CASA Briefing Newsletter - October 2015

CASA Briefing

October 2015

From CEO and Director of Aviation Safety, Mark Skidmore

The need for CASA to engage more effectively with the aviation community has been one of my top priorities from the day I took over as Director of Aviation Safety.  A key part of effective engagement is maintaining a meaningful, collaborative and mutually respectful relationship with everyone who makes up the aviation community.  To achieve this CASA must ensure we have open conversations with the people and organisations we regulate, providing the information needed to explain what we are doing and why.  As set out in CASA’s new regulatory philosophy there are six important points I expect our staff to address when they engage and communicate with the aviation community.  We need to explain what CASA proposes to do, why we propose the action, what we have considered in reaching the position, what alternatives have been considered and why they have been ruled out, what effects will result from the action and what recourse is there for anyone affected by our actions.  It is only fair that everyone gets this information in a clear and timely fashion so that there is a mutual understanding of CASA’s position and the opportunity for people and organisations that are affected to put forward comments or alternative proposals.

By sharing this information we are establishing one of the foundations for a safety partnership in which CASA is just one player in the aviation safety system we all belong to.  This does not mean CASA is a partner in every aviation activity – we do not run the large and small aviation businesses, fly the aircraft or provide the maintenance services.  But we should be and can be a partner in every aviation safety activity to support the aviation community in their efforts to achieve optimal safety outcomes.  In working together we can aim to get the right safety outcomes from the regulations and regulatory practices which should assist in contributing to a vibrant and strong aviation sector.  This fresh approach is already paying dividends as I see a change in attitude by many CASA staff towards the organisations and people we regulate.  I promise to continue to work hard to firmly entrench this approach across CASA through strong and effective leadership, staff education, training and support.

Recently I canvassed these issues in detail in a keynote address to the Qantas Safety Group Conference.

Safe flying

Mark Skidmore


Time to have your say on key issues

CASA wants everyone in Australian aviation to have their say.  To make getting your message to CASA simple and easy a new online tool has been launched.  By using the ‘have your say’ forums everyone can contribute to building a strong and safe aviation future.  Currently there are three forums open – developing Flight Plan 2030, implementing future regulations and delivering safety promotion.  Flight Plan 2030 is an opportunity to focus on the safety issues that will face all sectors of Australian aviation over the next 15 years.  Having your say on this forum means your views will be listened to as CASA develops the Flight Plan 2030 document, which will focus on future safety challenges and opportunities.  By using the implementing future regulations forum your views on the timing of new regulations, ways to implement new rules and how CASA can best support the aviation community during regulatory change will be heard.  Your comments will be fed into the development of regulatory implementation plans, as well as communication and information strategies.  The safety promotion forum is to encourage discussion about how you prefer to receive safety information so CASA can make sure important messages are getting to everyone in the most effective ways.  To participate in any of the forums you need to register.  To protect privacy a screen name or alias can be used to remain anonymous.  When active each discussion will be moderated using standard policies and guidelines to ensure everyone can have a say and many different ideas and viewpoints can be heard.

Go to the have your say online forums now.

Watch to learn about ADS-B

There’s an easy new way to learn all about the basics and benefits of the automatic dependant surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) system.  A short online video explains how ADS-B works and why a number of air operators and aircraft owners have chosen to adopt the system early.  Airservices Australia produced the video, which features several chief pilots and a Cessna 182 owner talking about their ADS-B experiences.  With more than 70 ground stations across the nation ADS-B now covers most of Australia, enhancing safety and efficiency.  Andrew Anderson, an IFR pilot and Cessna 182 owner, says there are important benefits for general aviation from ADS-B.  He says the burden of communications on a general aviation pilot can be reduced when using ADS-B as position reports to air traffic control are not required.  Royal Flying Doctor Service Queensland chief pilot Shane Lawrey says adopting ADS-B for their operations was a “no brainer” after an early trial.  Rick Heaton, chief pilot at Alliance Airlines, says coverage in central Australia was a big benefit for his operations and customers appreciate being able to track aircraft.  From 2 February 2017 all aircraft operating under instrument flight rules in Australia will be required to be equipped with 1090 MHz Extended Squitter ADS-B.

Watch the ADS-B video now.

Online maintenance personnel exams start

Assessment Services Limited will now be delivering online aircraft maintenance personnel examination services for CASA.  Maintenance personnel exams will be held at least six times a year at multiple locations around Australia.  People can continue to sit the CASA basics exams and use schedules of experience to obtain a small aircraft maintenance licence until June 2019.  After that date all training will be delivered by approved maintenance training organisations delivering Mechatronics courses under the Aeroskills Training Package.  Until now CASA has directly delivered paper-based multiple-choice maintenance theory exams.  By putting the exams on-line delivery and assessment will be improved.  Assessment Services Ltd is an Australian company that has provided flight crew exam services to the aviation industry for more than 13 years.  The new maintenance personnel exam booking web site will be available from 27 October 2015, with the first exams to be held shortly after this date.  Anyone who wishes to register can do so now by contacting Assessment Services Ltd on 02 6262 8820 or email infoau@aslexam.com

Find out more about maintenance personnel exams.

Clearing up PICUS concerns

CASA has received feedback from the aviation community seeking clarification about how the new flight crew licensing regulations affect pilot in command under supervision (PICUS) operations.  The concern is about who can be the pilot in command of a PICUS operation under Civil Aviation Safety Regulation Part 61.  Operators who do not have a training and checking organisation under Civil Aviation Regulation (CAR) 217 may conduct PICUS operations.  For these operations the pilot in command does not have to be an instructor or examiner.  The reference in Part 61 to training and checking responsibilities does not mean there has to be a training and checking organisation in place.  All chief pilots have training and checking responsibilities, even if the operator does not have a training and checking organisation under CAR 217.  Operators regularly conduct PICUS operations by assigning a suitably qualified and competent pilot in the command seat as the pilot in command and another qualified company pilot in the other control seat, who acts as pilot in command under supervision.  Civil Aviation Safety Regulation 61.095 does not preclude this activity.  However, a chief pilot must be satisfied the pilot in command is competent operating from the other control seat and the operations manual needs to have adequate procedures in place for the operation to be conducted safely.  Consideration has to be given to normal and emergency circumstances.

Get more information on Part 61.

Comment now on the Office of Airspace Regulation

The aviation community is being asked to contribute to a review of the functions and operations of CASA’s Office of Airspace Regulation.  The review is looking at issues such as the airspace legislation, structures and processes in the Office of Airspace Regulation, effectiveness of the Office and stakeholder management.  It will also look at the implementation of the Government’s policy objectives in the current and previous Australian Airspace Policy Statements.  All feedback and comment on the Office of Airspace Regulation will be welcomed by the review, with details and examples to support comments particularly valuable.  CASA has published a list of questions on its web site to help people and organisations focus on specific areas that will assist the review.  The review is being undertaken as a result of a requirement in the latest Statement of Expectations issued to CASA by the Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development.  The review team will acknowledge and attribute all submissions however anonymity can be requested.  Submissions should be sent to CASA by Friday 20 November 2015 by email to: oar@casa.gov.au  Please use the words ‘OAR review’ in the subject line of emails.

Find out more about the OAR review.

New rules for large air transport operations

Proposed updated and improved safety regulations for large passenger and cargo aeroplane operations have been released for comment.  Under the proposed new rules there will no longer be different safety standards for charter flights, with a single safety standard for charter and regular public transport.  Other key changes include provisions for the use of new technology such as synthetic vision and enhanced vision systems, requirements for underwater locating devices on some flights, requirements for additional medical equipment on aircraft, restrictions on rostering inexperienced flight crew and new training and checking requirements for cabin crew.  There has been comprehensive consultation on the proposed rules with airlines, smaller air operators, aviation industry representative groups and pilot and cabin crew unions.

The proposed new rules – to be contained in Part 121 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations – align to the maximum extent possible with International Civil Aviation Organization standards and recommended practices.  They consolidate all existing regulations for charter and regular public transport operations into one rule set, which is supported by a manual of standards as well as guidance material.  Many of the proposed changes will formalise current practices, while others will simplify compliance.  Other changes proposed include new terminology and rules for extended diversion time operations, clearer rules for operations on narrow runways, simplified equipment regulations, new datalink recording requirements, options for more flexible pilot training and checking programs, simplified pilot recency requirements, formalising a cabin crew to passenger seat ratio of one to fifty and new recency requirements for cabin crew.  The rules will apply to passenger and cargo operations in aeroplanes fitted with more than nine passenger seats or with a maximum take-off weight of more than 8,618 kilograms.

Get the full details and lodge comments now.

Fatigue risk management forum to answer your questions

A special forum is being held for aviation organisations developing or planning to develop a fatigue risk management system.  The aim of the forum is to ensure there is a mutual understanding between CASA and aviation organisations of the requirements and expected outcomes to be achieved prior to being approved for a trial of a fatigue risk management system.  Before CASA approves a full fatigue risk management system there is a trial period of between 12 and 24 months to ensure the system is fully functional and able to respond to changes in the organisation and operating environment.  With about 20 aviation organisations having expressed an interest in adopting a fatigue risk management system CASA wants to ensure information is shared and questions can be addressed.  The forum will offer practical advice and support, with several experts in fatigue to make presentations and take part in discussions.  The Australian Transport Safety Bureau will also talk about how it approaches fatigue issues during accident investigations.  CASA inspectors will take part in the forum to hear first-hand the issues raised by aviation organisations and to ensure there is a consistent approach within CASA to fatigue risk management system assessments and approvals.  The forum is being held on Wednesday 11 November 2015 from 09:00 to 16:30 at the Swinburne University AGSE building, room 207.

Book your place now by emailing fatigue.management@casa.gov.au

Talking to CASA in November is easy

There are lots of opportunities to interact with CASA in November 2015.  Fifteen AvSafety seminars will be held in five states, three ‘have your say forums’ are being run in two states and two Flight Plan 2030 forums are scheduled.  The AvSafety seminars focus on two key safety issues that continue to feature in accidents - flight in low visibility and unplanned or unapproved low flying.  There will be a discussion about at least one case study from accident reports featuring low visibility or low flying.  Pilots will be asked to look at why the accidents occurred and how they could have been avoided.  Other issues to be covered include operating at non-controlled aerodromes, regulatory changes and maintenance releases.  AvSafety seminars also offer the chance to provide feedback to CASA and discuss local issues.  The ‘have your say’ forums are being held at Perth, Jandakot and Adelaide, with the focus on the implementation of new regulations.  They give people in aviation the chance to provide advice to CASA on the timing of new regulations and ways to support the aviation community during implementation.  The Flight Plan 2030 forums are being held in Launceston on 10 November and Brisbane on 26 November.  These forums gather views on the safety issues, challenges and opportunities facing Australian aviation over the next 15 years.  This consultation will result in the formal development of the Flight Plan 2030 document in 2016.

Find an AvSafety seminar.

Get to a ‘have your say forum’

Attend the Brisbane Flight Plan 2030 forum.

Air traffic drops as mining slows

The slowing of the resource sector has led directly to a decrease in air traffic at Roma in Queensland.  A study of the airspace 30 nautical miles around Roma found aircraft movements dropped in the first months of 2015, after strong growth since 2010.  There are now a number of cancelled scheduled services each month and charter flights have been cut by resource companies.  As air traffic growth has slowed the number of reported incidents has tapered off.  There is a narrow mix of air traffic at Roma, with regular public transport, charter and emergency services using similar aircraft types with similar performance levels.  General aviation activity in smaller aircraft is limited.  Inbound and outbound air routes provide good traffic segregation and there are no issues with the current lower limit of Class E airspace at flight level 180.  The study did not find any safety need for lowering Class E in the vicinity of Roma.  It recommended aircraft and passenger movements continue to be monitored over the next 12 months to determine if the current slowing trend in aviation activity continues and if this results in a further decrease in incidents.

Read the Roma airspace study.

Drone flyers warned to stay away from bushfires

People who fly unmanned aerial vehicles – commonly known as drones - near bushfires are being warned they could face a fine of $9000.  This is because drones can pose a real safety risk to firefighting aircraft and bush firefighters.  A Civil Aviation Safety Regulation says unmanned aircraft must not be operated in a way that creates a hazard to another aircraft, person or property.  The penalty for a breach of this regulation is 50 Commonwealth penalty units.  A Commonwealth penalty unit is $180.  Drones flown in bushfires could collide with firefighting aircraft or hit firefighters on the ground.  A collision between a drone and a firefighting aeroplane or helicopter could lead to a catastrophic accident.  If a drone is seen in the vicinity of a bushfire and is believed to have put aircraft or firefighters at risk CASA can investigate and if a breach of the safety rules is identified an infringement notice can be issued.  Flying a drone near a bushfire is also very likely to cause aerial firefighting to be suspended until the drone is located and removed due to the risk of a mid-air collision with an aircraft.  This means the bushfire may not be effectively controlled and people on the ground put at extra risk.  Everyone who flies a drone should understand the importance of keeping away from bushfires and other emergency situations at all times unless they have the appropriate approvals from CASA and emergency services.  Working with the National Aerial Firefighting Centre and state firefighting authorities CASA has launched a social media awareness campaign on Facebook with the tagline: ‘If you fly, they can’t’.  Since the launch of the campaign in September the post has reached more than 300,000 people.

CASA has also released a brochure and poster as part of the drone safety campaign.


For a print friendly version of this email visit The CASA Briefing on the CASA website. Alternatively, when printing this email change the paper orientation to landscape.



CIVIL AVIATION SAFETY AUTHORITY SPORT AVIATION

AMAS AGM

The AMAS Inc AGM Youtube can be found here:

And another open letter.

Open letter to NSW aero modeller members.

AMAS AGM/GM Nominations-Notices of motion.

Please be advised:

The following nominations and notices of motion have been received.

President: Mr John Taylor. Nominated Mark Fenlon, seconded Patsy Brown.

Vice President: Mr Shane Hunter. Nominated Phillip Poole, seconded Jim Edwards.

Treasurer: Mrs Patsy Brown. Nominated Paul Thomas, seconded Helen Ryan.

Committee member: Mr Mark Fenlon. Nominated Richard Brown, seconded Adrian Pradella.

Secretary:  Mr Mike Snabaitis. Nominated John Taylor, seconded Mark Fenlon

Notices of motion:

Changes to the AMAS inc constitution received from Mr John Taylor and seconded by the management committee as underlined.


5 CLASSES OF MEMBERS
5.1
A Senior
B Junior
C Life
Provisional Member
E Day Member

5.5 A Provisional member is deemed to be  a person who is a prospective member of  the AMAS Inc and who is allowed a maximum of 4 visits to an AMAS Inc affiliated  club under  strict supervision according to the AMAS By Laws 
 Provisional membership visits must be carried out within a maximum two month period at the end of which the person will be requested to pay their fees and join the club.
Provisional membership can only be applied for once.

5.6 The number of members is unlimited.


5.6 DAY Membership
5.6.1
That visitors to a club affiliated with the Australian Miniature Aerosport Society other than Provisional Members and other than prospective club members, shall be permitted to purchase single day membership of the society for the purpose of undertaking flying activities whilst a visitor at said club.

5.6.2 The cost of day membership shall be determined annually by the Management Committee of the AMAS.

5.6.3 Day membership shall expire on the day of issue either at the conclusion of the visit to the club or otherwise at 10PM  (whichever is earlier) on the date it is issued.

5.6.4 Insurance cover provided by the Society as a consequence of receiving day membership to the AMAS, shall cease at the expiration of such membership as described in 5.6.3 5.6.5 Such membership shall only be made available by an affiliated club of the society to bona-fide visitors where the club is satisfied that the visitor does not possess appropriate insurance cover to undertake model flying activities. 5.6.6 The club issuing day membership shall, prior to issuing such class of membership:- a) register the person as a visiting day member b) provide appropriate advice to the person regarding club rules and CASA regulations. c) receive written acknowledgement of understanding and an undertaking to comply with such club rules and CASA regulations from the said visitor. d) prior to permitting the visitor to operate any model aircraft without supervision, appropriately assess the flying competency level of the said visitor.

5.6.7 A person  requiring DAY Membership must apply and make payment on line  directly to the AMAS website using the the appropriate  registration method.
This can be be done simply using mobile phone , tablet or lap top.

26 The secretary must ensure full and accurate minutes of all questions, matters, resolutions and other proceedings of each management committee meeting are entered into in a minute book AND /Or RECORDED AND STORED BY ELECTRONIC MEDIA.

(2) To ensure the accuracy of the minutes, the minutes of each management committee meeting must be  approved by the chairperson of the meeting, or the chairperson of the next management committee meeting, verifying their accuracy.

41 Minutes of general meetings (1) The secretary must ensure full and accurate minutes of all questions, matters, resolutions and other proceedings of each general meeting are entered in a minute book or recorded in a form of electronic media. (2) To ensure the accuracy of the minutes— (a) the minutes of each general meeting must be approved by the chairperson of the meeting, or the chairperson of the next general meeting, verifying their accuracy; and (b) the minutes of each annual general meeting must be approved by the chairperson of the meeting, or the chairperson of the next meeting of the association that is a general meeting or annual general meeting, verifying their accuracy.


As per  clause 42 of the Constitution, members are requested to vote regarding the notices of motion.(please).

As received.

Kind regards,

Mike Snabaitis.
Secretary, AMAS inc.
0417879416

AMAS inc AGM/GM



AUSTRALIAN MINIATURE AEROSPORTS SOCIETY
NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING and GENERAL MEETING.
 

 

Live broadcast video via  Google Hangout
7:00 PM Saturday 26th September, 2015
at 11 Rifle Range, Bargara Qld.

Members,

Please be advised:

 

 

As you know the AMAS is the only aero-modeling association In Australia that offers every single member the right to participate and vote in the running of our organization at a national level.   Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members.   As a member of the AMAS you are encouraged to take part in the process. Please refer to the AMAS Inc Constitution for further detail which can be found via the website.

 

Notices of motion and nominations for Committee positions are now being called for. 

 

Nominations for committee positions are to be forwarded to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 12th September, 2015.

 

Nominations must be seconded by another member and include some details (a brief resume) regarding the nominee for the information of members.Nomination forms will be available via the website.

 

Positions:   President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, General Committee member

 

NOTICES OF MOTION

 

All notices of motion received will be forwarded to members by email on the 25th  August 2015 for consideration.

 

After members have been emailed the details of motion/s received, members may make submissions for or against the motion/s .Such submissions must be emailed to the Secretary AMAS before noon on 25th September, 2015.

 

Any submissions received requesting amendment to any motion will be put to the member who initially submitted the motion for consideration.  If the member agrees to any amendment of the motion previously submitted, the motion shall be amended and presented to membership in its revised form. 

Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.


Kind regards,

Mike Snabaitis.
Secretary AMAS inc


CIVIL AVIATION SAFETY AUTHORITY JULY BRIEFING

LATEST NEWSLETTER

The latest edition of the AMAS Inc newsletter can be found "here".


Correspondence from a club member to his fellow club members for their consideration at this time of year


Our founders searched for it, secured it, and made this field of ours for us, they scratched it out of the dirt and clay. They improved it, operated and cared for it in such a way, that our continued tenure and friendship with our landlord has almost convinced us to believe that they and we were being accepted as almost a partial owner rather than a tenant.
Great and lasting friendships have been forged here, much fun has been had here, much hard work has been done here, and great disappointments and grievance has been resolved here. It means more to us than just a stretch of mown grass, and I refuse to believe that those who have gone before us ,would be happy to learn that the field they gave so much to, is now under the complete and absolute control of the MAAA.
MAAA don’t help pay the rent, or provide any assistance in its maintenance, nor even visit us occasionally, yet the MAAA which has grown in perceived , but not real authority, as the governing association of modeling in Australia, now have granted them, by the membership of this club, the absolute power to determine who shall be eligible to fly at, or visit our club. The membership have granted power to the MAAA to force all prospective members of this club to promise exclusive rights to the MAAA , and forbid them to associate with members of persons affiliated to other associations or allow them to visit, or be invited to freely enjoy the facilities of our club. They have dictated that every person who joins our club must agree to join the MAAA, or be refused admission as a member of our club, and this membership has meekly accepted and endorsed those despotic demands.
The members also promise to give absolute obedience and priority to MAAA operating procedures which actually overrule CASA regulations and advice. Thus it accepts regulations which severely limit and prevent the use to which our field can be used by its members. In contradiction to CASA rules and regulations, MAAA determines and dictates the type, the size, the method of propulsion , permitted at our field, and we have given them the power to force our members to cease and desist in using any form of electronic device which MAAA don’t sanction or approve, without any form of explanation or exemption. Should you disobey any or all of these rules and regulations, your insurance will be become ineffectual.
So why do we continue to support an association which demands such complete subjugation to its onerous rules and libraries of restrictions , or proscribe the way in which our own private field can be used, on the basis of an expectation of an excess payment of $5000. When we could be free of all these unnecessary restrictions by switching our allegiance to the other CASA recognized governing association of modeling in Australia.
The great difference between the two modeling associations are, that AMAS do not profess to have greater academic knowledge than CASA when it comes to safe government of modeling in Australia. AMAS instead, recognize CASA as the absolute authority and reference with regards to the safe operation of all forms of aeromodeling in Australia. The AMAS approach to what we can and cannot do as a club, and as a club member operating on private land, is totally dependent on an agreement by all members to abide by all regulations issued by CASA. We can actually join and become a committee member of the association and have our say in its organization. We are free to operate and adopt all manner of craft and equipment supported by CASA safety regulations. We are not so much as a large club which needs to be governed by strict rules and regulations, or standard operation procedures, but rather as a large group of friends and groups of colleagues of similar skills, meeting in good will, whenever we wish, to enjoy our hobby and experiment with craft of our personal choosing. But we do need insurance, and we can obtain exactly the same cover, from the same insurer which covers both aeromodeling associations, but with an absolute limit of a $250.00 accident liability….not $5000.00!
Consider the plight of small clubs like ours, operating on a shoestring budget and with no intention of using the international affiliations funds that the extra dues that are foisted upon us by MAAA, so that members of the large affluent clubs may partake in overseas competition (overseen. of course by MAAA delegates) Indeed, how many members of our club are proficient enough or affluent enough or keen enough to even consider it?. The larger clubs with such grandiose intentions should be funding their junket needs themselves, not at the expense of the small clubs like ours trying hard to make ends meet and always aware of the tenuous nature of our tenancy.
MAAA place onerous extra provisions on us that qualified experts in aviation safety fail to recognize or endorse as necessary. How many of those who insist in such extra care and control over our behaviour, have any level of the qualifications that employees of CASA who have earned through diligent practice and academic effort.
Why should we, as a small club should we be forced to abandon any attempt to fly a helicopter, quad-copter, or a GPS equipped plane when CASA say we can?. Why should we accept what these unqualified people tell us are of a safer or more informed way of enjoying our sport, than the people charged, accepted and employed as qualified by the Australian Government to guard and enforce it.
Where, for instance, did the “inspectors” of heavy, large and turbine driven models gain their proficiency to pontificate on the subject. As far as I can ascertain, there are no recognized diplomas or degrees available to model aircraft hobbyists here or anywhere else which bestows consultative profficiency. So how do these self appointed pundits convince us that CASA authorities are not as proficient as they are, in determining the safe rules of model aircraft operation?
They will say it lowers the risk – but just what risk is there? We are never told about claims of injury death or damage or claims against the insurer. Perhaps the risk is not there to reduce! Perhaps that’s why the AMAS who use the same insurer, can offer a guaranteed excess lower than that of my car insurer but MAAA cannot!
Now that CASA by hard its work and persistence on our hobby’s behalf have finally exposed the myth and legend that MAAA alone are the only CASA recognised association governing the control of aeromodeling in Australia.
I again suggest that alternate membership of AMAS be seriously discussed as a viable and attractive means to regain true self government and club membership control of a piece of private and collectively controlled land.

full page flyer $ 49 membership
AMAS Inc now a member of QORF:

AMAS  Certificate
RIVERLAND MODEL AERO CLUB 
FLOAT PLANE WEEKEND

2015  Float  Plane  Weekend

Flight Safety Australia latest edition

Latest edition can be found here:


http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com


Further Important  information regarding Flight/Air Space safety can be found here:



Call to arms

National Electric Flight Rally 2015

Reduced Fees

STOP PRESS!  AS VOTED BY THE MEMBERS AND RATIFIED AT THE JANUARY GENERAL MEETING AMAS 2015/16 MEMBERSHIP FEES REDUCED!! COMMENCING JULY 1st THE 12 MONTH FEES FOR ADULT AND JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP WILL BE $49 and $24. SIMPLIFIED INSURANCE!

Flight Safety Australia

Important information regarding Flight/Air Space safety can be found here:



Edition 4 AMAS Newsletter

Edition 4 of the AMAS Newsletter can be found here.

AMAS SAFETY CODE

The revised policy can be found in the documents section.

AMAS News

An interim  edition of the AMAS newsletter can be found here:

Interim Newsletter

Next AMAS newsletter will be issued in early December.


Academy of Model Aeronautics.

Recent contact with the Academy of Model Aeronautics in America has allowed the Australian Miniature Aerosports Society to 'link' to the academy education page which can be found here:


Day membership

Day membership ($5) is now available via the homepage(Register now button).

Edition 3 AMAS Newsletter

Edition 3 of the AMAS Newsletter can be found here.

2014 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Live broadcast video via  Google Hangout

7:30 PM Friday 25th July, 2014
at the Penrith Community Centre.

As you know the AMAS  Inc is the only aero-modeling association In Australia that offers every single member the right to participate and vote in the running of our organization at a national level.   Our democratic process is our great strength since it enables us to retain our focus where it needs to be, on our members.   As a member of the AMAS Inc  you are encouraged to take part in the process. Visitors are very welcome. The AMAS Inc Constitution can be found via the website.

 

You can watch the AGM and GM here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YizIUp_07MU


Do not hesitate to contact the Society if you have any questions.


Kind regards,

Mike Snabaitis.
Secretary AMAS inc
0417879416

Edition 2 AMAS newsletter

Edition 2 of the AMAS Newsletter can be found here. Please note that Dr Aleck, Associate Director CASA, has also provided a response to the newsletter below. It is important that you read both. Please feel free to circulate both documents to anyone you feel would be interested. 


***IMPORTANT UPDATE***

As per an undertaking given by our Society to Dr Aleck, Associate Director CASA, we provide the attached letter.

The AMAS has considered the letter and other than an apparent misunderstanding regarding our interaction with personnel from the Sport Aviation office, we are pleased that the substance of the report of our meeting with the Associate director which appeared in our newsletter, has not been disagreed with. 

We have again been in contact with the Associate Director and welcomed the commitment of the CASA to dealing with both national aero-modeling associations in an even handed and equitable manner (which we consider is the thrust of his attached letter), and in this regard we are pleased to advise that an invitation has been extended to the Society to attend the forthcoming Sport Aviation Safety Forum hosted by CASA later this month.

Dr Aleck, Associate Director CASA  has provided a response to our newsletter. Aleck Response.

Kind Regards
Ian Macgregor
President
AMAS.

AMAS Safety Code

***Safety is no Accident.*** 

The safety code can be found in the Documents sections. 

You can download a copy here

CASA NPRM 1309OS - Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems

This amendment to CASR Part 101 relates to Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) used for commercial operations, but excludes model aircraft used for recreational purposes.

The CASA link can be found here. LINK

Edition 1 AMAS newsletter

Can be found here: Edition 1.